maandag 31 mei 2010

Gold Digging in Surinam Mark Nozeman Photography


Mark Nozeman (b 1971, Netherlands) graduated with a  BFA in photography and history from the St. Joost Academy of Fine Arts Breda in Rotterdam. He has worked extensively in Brazil, Latin America and Europe and has exhibited at The National Museum of Ethnology Leiden (NL), The Royal Tropical Museum, Amsterdam and SESC Pompeia, São Paulo, Brazil. Mark’s awards include the Dutch Silver Camera Award for the Cuban interior series. He has received project grants  from  the Anna Cornelis Foundation, Sem Presser Foundation and The Dutch Foundation for Fine Arts. He is currently working on a  long term project about the relationship between individual identity and nationality in the  shifting European identity of emerging generations in post conflict regions. His work has been published in NRC, De Volkskrant, Noticias, Trouw, De Fotograaf, Camera Austria and others. See for more Dwelling and Belonging, by Mark Nozeman ...
About the Photograph:
The indigenous population of Surinam were called Marrons until 20 years ago.. They did not exploit gold in their part of the Amazon forest. That all changed after the collapse of the Surinam economy due to conflicts ( ‘De Binnenlandse Oorlog’) between the government and the Jungle Commando of Ronnie Brunswijk. During the past ten years Surinam has been invaded by small well organized Brazilian groups called Garimpeiros (gold diggers). Most of them are living illegally in the forest. They came overland through the Amazon Jungle of Pará and Amapá. Pollution due to mercury is a disaster for the environment. Prostitution, robbery and murder are common. Malaria and sexual transmitted diseases are on the rise”.


See also Defending the Secret Slave State - Suriname ...













Gold Digging in Surinam Mark Nozeman Photography


Mark Nozeman (b 1971, Netherlands) graduated with a  BFA in photography and history from the St. Joost Academy of Fine Arts Breda in Rotterdam. He has worked extensively in Brazil, Latin America and Europe and has exhibited at The National Museum of Ethnology Leiden (NL), The Royal Tropical Museum, Amsterdam and SESC Pompeia, São Paulo, Brazil. Mark’s awards include the Dutch Silver Camera Award for the Cuban interior series. He has received project grants  from  the Anna Cornelis Foundation, Sem Presser Foundation and The Dutch Foundation for Fine Arts. He is currently working on a  long term project about the relationship between individual identity and nationality in the  shifting European identity of emerging generations in post conflict regions. His work has been published in NRC, De Volkskrant, Noticias, Trouw, De Fotograaf, Camera Austria and others. See for more Dwelling and Belonging, by Mark Nozeman ...
About the Photograph:
The indigenous population of Surinam were called Marrons until 20 years ago.. They did not exploit gold in their part of the Amazon forest. That all changed after the collapse of the Surinam economy due to conflicts ( ‘De Binnenlandse Oorlog’) between the government and the Jungle Commando of Ronnie Brunswijk. During the past ten years Surinam has been invaded by small well organized Brazilian groups called Garimpeiros (gold diggers). Most of them are living illegally in the forest. They came overland through the Amazon Jungle of Pará and Amapá. Pollution due to mercury is a disaster for the environment. Prostitution, robbery and murder are common. Malaria and sexual transmitted diseases are on the rise”.


See also Defending the Secret Slave State - Suriname ...













zondag 30 mei 2010

Marrtin Parr about ParrWorld Collecting Photobooks Photography



Martin Parr talks about his photography, his passion for collecting and his only Uk showing of his exhibition 'Parrworld' at the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art.Part 1 of 3.






Martin Parr

A View without Illusion

A Martin Parr photograph is like a painting by William Turner, a sentence written by Thomas Mann, the voice of Frank Sinatra or the scent of Chanel No. 5. Parr’s imagery is so characteristic that we recognize it immediately. And it is strong enough to condition our perception: once we leave a Parr exhibition, we find that we, too, are viewing the people and objects surrounding us from Parr’s perspective. And suddenly, the Parr cosmos is everywhere. 
The Parr cosmos? What does it consist of? Martin Parr takes pictures of people: on the phone, eating, standing in line, people at the grocery store, going to church, relaxing on the beach, tourists, dancers, bird watchers, gamekeepers, bored couples – people, young and old. And Martin Parr photographs objects: prefab houses, for example, whose uniformity carries the monotony of British suburban neighborhoods to the extreme. Or British living rooms with the ubiquitous floral carpets, wallpapers, curtains, sofas – and the artificial flowers on the television set. Or food: be it sandwichs, sizzling bacon, hot dogs, fish & chips, plates of French fries, ice cream, lollypops or iced cupcakes. Parr makes them seem artificial, unappetizing.
For more than thirty years, Martin Parr has recorded life and society, mostly of his homeland, Britain. In his early black-and-white works, people and landscapes still possessed a sentimental, nostalgic flair. In the 1980s, however, he began working in color, and his focus eventually lost all softness. Today, Parr is mainly interested in objects or the details of people’s appearances – a grinning mouth, polished nails – which he depicts in a garish, exposing way. 
Oscar Wilde’s definition of a cynic is a rather apt description of the photographer Martin Parr. He shows us the world as it is, not as it is meant to be. The morality of Parr’s bleak, sober view of society, customs and traditions is debatable. His position is like that of a doctor who diagnoses an illness without offering an appropriate remedy. Probably because he is infected, too.
Image: West Bay, Dorset, 1997, 50 x 76 cm

See also Martin Parr on Dutch Photography ...










Marrtin Parr about ParrWorld Collecting Photobooks Photography



Martin Parr talks about his photography, his passion for collecting and his only Uk showing of his exhibition 'Parrworld' at the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art.Part 1 of 3.






Martin Parr

A View without Illusion

A Martin Parr photograph is like a painting by William Turner, a sentence written by Thomas Mann, the voice of Frank Sinatra or the scent of Chanel No. 5. Parr’s imagery is so characteristic that we recognize it immediately. And it is strong enough to condition our perception: once we leave a Parr exhibition, we find that we, too, are viewing the people and objects surrounding us from Parr’s perspective. And suddenly, the Parr cosmos is everywhere. 
The Parr cosmos? What does it consist of? Martin Parr takes pictures of people: on the phone, eating, standing in line, people at the grocery store, going to church, relaxing on the beach, tourists, dancers, bird watchers, gamekeepers, bored couples – people, young and old. And Martin Parr photographs objects: prefab houses, for example, whose uniformity carries the monotony of British suburban neighborhoods to the extreme. Or British living rooms with the ubiquitous floral carpets, wallpapers, curtains, sofas – and the artificial flowers on the television set. Or food: be it sandwichs, sizzling bacon, hot dogs, fish & chips, plates of French fries, ice cream, lollypops or iced cupcakes. Parr makes them seem artificial, unappetizing.
For more than thirty years, Martin Parr has recorded life and society, mostly of his homeland, Britain. In his early black-and-white works, people and landscapes still possessed a sentimental, nostalgic flair. In the 1980s, however, he began working in color, and his focus eventually lost all softness. Today, Parr is mainly interested in objects or the details of people’s appearances – a grinning mouth, polished nails – which he depicts in a garish, exposing way. 
Oscar Wilde’s definition of a cynic is a rather apt description of the photographer Martin Parr. He shows us the world as it is, not as it is meant to be. The morality of Parr’s bleak, sober view of society, customs and traditions is debatable. His position is like that of a doctor who diagnoses an illness without offering an appropriate remedy. Probably because he is infected, too.
Image: West Bay, Dorset, 1997, 50 x 76 cm

See also Martin Parr on Dutch Photography ...










donderdag 27 mei 2010

Arbeit! Constructivism Bauhaus Paul Wolff Documentary Photography


FIRST EDITION OF PAUL WOLFF’S ARBEIT!, 1937, A CELEBRATION OF INDUSTRIALISM IN THE BAUHAUS TRADITION, WITH 200 DRAMATIC PHOTOGRAVURE PLATES

WOLFF, Paul. Arbeit! Berlin: Volk und Reich; Frankfurt am Main: H. Bechold, (1937). Square quarto, original blind-stamped brown paper-covered boards, original photographic dust jacket.   

First edition of Wolff’s highly influential celebration of German industrialism, with 200 photogravure plates in the tradition of Renger-Patzch’s Eisen und Stahl (1931). Beside "Schwarzes Revier" by Heinrich Hauser, "Metal" by Germaine Krull, "Fabrik" by Jakob Tuggener and "Eisen und Stahl" by Albert Renger-Patzsch one of the best ever published industrial ( industry ) photography books.


Rare photographic Nazi propaganda on the importance of the German workforce in Hitler's Third Reich. Illustrated throughout with captioned reproductions of b/w photographs showing the construction of the Autobahn, the Siemenswerk in Berlin, farmers, factory workers, drills and activities of the Freiwillige Arbeitsdienst, construction and maintenance of railroads, etc. Text in German, gothic script.


German photographer Paul Wolff, often working in collaboration with Alfred Tritschler, produced a number of exceptional photobooks through the 1920s and ‘30s, at a time when Constructivism and the Bauhaus influenced many with visions “of an industrialized and socialized society” that placed Germany at “the forefront of European photography” (Parr & Badger, 86). Arbeit! is particularly noted for its architectural framing and lighting of massive machinery, its striking portraits of factory workers, and is frequently aligned with works such as Lewis Hine’s Men at Work (1932) and Albert Renger-Patzsch’s Eisen und Stahl (1931). Introduction by Paul Ehrhardt. Text in German, captions in German, English and French.




Arbeit! Constructivism Bauhaus Paul Wolff Documentary Photography


FIRST EDITION OF PAUL WOLFF’S ARBEIT!, 1937, A CELEBRATION OF INDUSTRIALISM IN THE BAUHAUS TRADITION, WITH 200 DRAMATIC PHOTOGRAVURE PLATES

WOLFF, Paul. Arbeit! Berlin: Volk und Reich; Frankfurt am Main: H. Bechold, (1937). Square quarto, original blind-stamped brown paper-covered boards, original photographic dust jacket.   

First edition of Wolff’s highly influential celebration of German industrialism, with 200 photogravure plates in the tradition of Renger-Patzch’s Eisen und Stahl (1931). Beside "Schwarzes Revier" by Heinrich Hauser, "Metal" by Germaine Krull, "Fabrik" by Jakob Tuggener and "Eisen und Stahl" by Albert Renger-Patzsch one of the best ever published industrial ( industry ) photography books.


Rare photographic Nazi propaganda on the importance of the German workforce in Hitler's Third Reich. Illustrated throughout with captioned reproductions of b/w photographs showing the construction of the Autobahn, the Siemenswerk in Berlin, farmers, factory workers, drills and activities of the Freiwillige Arbeitsdienst, construction and maintenance of railroads, etc. Text in German, gothic script.


German photographer Paul Wolff, often working in collaboration with Alfred Tritschler, produced a number of exceptional photobooks through the 1920s and ‘30s, at a time when Constructivism and the Bauhaus influenced many with visions “of an industrialized and socialized society” that placed Germany at “the forefront of European photography” (Parr & Badger, 86). Arbeit! is particularly noted for its architectural framing and lighting of massive machinery, its striking portraits of factory workers, and is frequently aligned with works such as Lewis Hine’s Men at Work (1932) and Albert Renger-Patzsch’s Eisen und Stahl (1931). Introduction by Paul Ehrhardt. Text in German, captions in German, English and French.




woensdag 26 mei 2010

the Lowing Cow Logo of a photographer Martien Coppens Subjective Photography






COPPENS, MARTIEN FOTO'S - CRAEYBECKX, H INLEIDING - Nood

Eindhoven - Leiden, Van Abbemuseum / De Lakenhal, 1953. 24 pp., geniet. 1e druk. 19 x 26 cm. Inscr.: . 7 en 16 en 1 pagina. Catalogusbij de tentoonstellingen van 53 en 54 over de Stormramp en Ontheemden in Duitsland. Er werden 83 foto's tentoongesteld en 16 daarvan zijn afgedrukt in deze cat.


Open publication - Free publishing - More essay





"Those commonplace and merely beautiful pictures, which thrive mainly thanks to the charm of some actual object, are thrust into the background in favor of experiments and fresh solutions. Adventures into the realm of optics are still for the most part unpopular. But only that photography which enlists the help of the experimental will be able to lay bare all the technical formation of the visual experience in our times." Otto Steinert

"Art would perhaps be authentic only when it had totally rid itself of the idea of authenticity . . ." Theodor Adorno

the Lowing Cow Logo of a photographer Martien Coppens Subjective Photography






COPPENS, MARTIEN FOTO'S - CRAEYBECKX, H INLEIDING - Nood

Eindhoven - Leiden, Van Abbemuseum / De Lakenhal, 1953. 24 pp., geniet. 1e druk. 19 x 26 cm. Inscr.: . 7 en 16 en 1 pagina. Catalogusbij de tentoonstellingen van 53 en 54 over de Stormramp en Ontheemden in Duitsland. Er werden 83 foto's tentoongesteld en 16 daarvan zijn afgedrukt in deze cat.


Open publication - Free publishing - More essay





"Those commonplace and merely beautiful pictures, which thrive mainly thanks to the charm of some actual object, are thrust into the background in favor of experiments and fresh solutions. Adventures into the realm of optics are still for the most part unpopular. But only that photography which enlists the help of the experimental will be able to lay bare all the technical formation of the visual experience in our times." Otto Steinert

"Art would perhaps be authentic only when it had totally rid itself of the idea of authenticity . . ." Theodor Adorno

dinsdag 25 mei 2010

an Artist making Photographs Cindy Sherman Photography






Cindy Sherman, Transformations: The Making of a Documentary - Professor Paul Tschinkel

As an undergraduate, Paul Tschinkel studied painting at the Yale School of Art and Architecture, then, as a member of the New York art scene, pursued video as an art form early in its conception. Since then, he has trained his camera on friends and colleagues in the art world and produced documentaries that have become important accounts of contemporary art and valuable resources for scholars and students of recent art. His video studies capture defining and cutting-edge works by such iconic names as Warhol, Lichtenstein, Basquiat, Koons, Sherman, and many others. CINDY SHERMAN (1954- ) creates innovative work that explores the place of women in society. With photographs she takes of herself, in which she impersonates various fictitious characters, she challenges us to think about our perceptions as she shows us numerous roles women can have in our world, such as house wife, sex symbol, lover, victim. Over the past 25 years, she has produced a much acclaimed body of work that depicts the female persona as seen through the filter of the media. In his lecture, Professor Tschinkel will screen his documentary that covers Sherman's first show of color photographs at Metro Pictures in 1981 and a 2000 show, also at Metro Pictures. Included is a rare 1981 interview with Sherman and recent interviews with Helene Winer, her dealer, and Peter Schjeldahl, art critic for the The New Yorker magazine. He will then discuss the art of making documentaries as well as his passion for art and artist. See also Collecting Photograph$ Rudolf Koppitz William Klein Cindy Sherman Charles Jones TEFAF Maastricht 2010 Photography ...

an Artist making Photographs Cindy Sherman Photography






Cindy Sherman, Transformations: The Making of a Documentary - Professor Paul Tschinkel

As an undergraduate, Paul Tschinkel studied painting at the Yale School of Art and Architecture, then, as a member of the New York art scene, pursued video as an art form early in its conception. Since then, he has trained his camera on friends and colleagues in the art world and produced documentaries that have become important accounts of contemporary art and valuable resources for scholars and students of recent art. His video studies capture defining and cutting-edge works by such iconic names as Warhol, Lichtenstein, Basquiat, Koons, Sherman, and many others. CINDY SHERMAN (1954- ) creates innovative work that explores the place of women in society. With photographs she takes of herself, in which she impersonates various fictitious characters, she challenges us to think about our perceptions as she shows us numerous roles women can have in our world, such as house wife, sex symbol, lover, victim. Over the past 25 years, she has produced a much acclaimed body of work that depicts the female persona as seen through the filter of the media. In his lecture, Professor Tschinkel will screen his documentary that covers Sherman's first show of color photographs at Metro Pictures in 1981 and a 2000 show, also at Metro Pictures. Included is a rare 1981 interview with Sherman and recent interviews with Helene Winer, her dealer, and Peter Schjeldahl, art critic for the The New Yorker magazine. He will then discuss the art of making documentaries as well as his passion for art and artist. See also Collecting Photograph$ Rudolf Koppitz William Klein Cindy Sherman Charles Jones TEFAF Maastricht 2010 Photography ...