zondag 27 april 2008

Andre Zucca gay Paris Collaboration Photography

Andre Zucca's photographs of gay Paris at war paint an uneasy portrait of city collaboration From The Times April 18, 2008

Charles Bremner in Paris
An unusual warning has been added to a Paris exhibition that has shocked some visitors and media, despite the absence of sex, violence or religion.

The photographic show has caused offence by depicting the French capital in the Second World War as a sunny place, where people enjoyed life alongside their Nazi occupiers.

Bertrand Delanoë, the Mayor, ordered a notice, in French and English, to be handed out at the door of the municipal exhibition of colour photographs that have stirred ghosts that Paris preferred to forget. The 270 never-published pictures avoid the “reality of occupation and its tragic aspects”, says the warning.

In the French collective memory, early 1940s Paris was a black-and-white hell of hunger, Nazi round-ups, humiliation and resistance. Films and books have in recent decades modified the cliché. The breathtaking colour series by André Zucca, a French photographer, show as never before a gay Paris that got on with life without great hardship.

Well-dressed citizens shop on the boulevards and stroll in the parks; young people crowd nightclubs; bikini-clad women bathe in the fashionable Deligny pool. The terraces of familiar cafés are crowded and commuters with briefcases march into the Métro.

The differences are the absent traffic, the Wehrmacht uniforms and red swastikas hanging from the grandest facades. In one sinister picture – taken in the street beside the gallery – an old woman wears a yellow Star of David, the insignia that Jews were forced to display. According to critics, the organisers at the Paris Historical Library neglected to make it clear that Zucca, a respected prewar photographer, was working for the German propaganda machine.

Pierre Assouline, a writer, said in Le Monde: “In the shadows of these same streets, they were dying of hunger and cold. Raids and torture were taking place. Here we see only relaxation, joie de vivre, the nonchalance of a kind of happiness.” Christophe Girard, the deputy mayor in charge of culture, said that he found the exhibition “em-barrassing, ambiguous and poorly explained”.

Jean Derens, the director of the library, rejected the criticism, saying that everyone knew the photographer was a collaborator: “If there is a visitor who is unaware of the nature of the occupation, it’s sad, but that does not mean that everything has to be reexplained every time.” He said that the critics were not content with his leaflet, which states: “Zucca portrays a casual, even carefree Paris. He has opted for a vision that does not show . . . the queues . . . the rounding-up of Jews, posters announcing executions.” The library praises the skill of Zucca, “who played on colours like an aesthete” and chronicled the occupation privately, using rare Agfacolor film supplied by the Wehrmacht. The sunny aspect of the photos stemmed from the need to shoot the early colour film in bright light, it adds.

The exhibition reminds viewers that Paris was relatively comfortable under the Nazis because Joseph Goebbels, Hitler’s propaganda chief, decreed that the capital should be “animated and gay” to show off the “new Europe”. Theatres and cinemas were kept busy; Edith Piaf sang, and Herbert von Karajan conducted.

The collection, restored to the original colour with digital techniques, was bought by the city from Zucca’s family in 1985. The photographer was arrested after the 1944 liberation but never prosecuted. He worked until his death in 1976 under an assumed name as a wedding photographer west of Paris.

— The exhibition is open every day except Mondays, 11am to 7pm, at the Bibliotheque Historique de la Ville de Paris. Lees meer ...



Andre Zucca gay Paris Collaboration Photography

Andre Zucca's photographs of gay Paris at war paint an uneasy portrait of city collaboration From The Times April 18, 2008

Charles Bremner in Paris
An unusual warning has been added to a Paris exhibition that has shocked some visitors and media, despite the absence of sex, violence or religion.

The photographic show has caused offence by depicting the French capital in the Second World War as a sunny place, where people enjoyed life alongside their Nazi occupiers.

Bertrand Delanoë, the Mayor, ordered a notice, in French and English, to be handed out at the door of the municipal exhibition of colour photographs that have stirred ghosts that Paris preferred to forget. The 270 never-published pictures avoid the “reality of occupation and its tragic aspects”, says the warning.

In the French collective memory, early 1940s Paris was a black-and-white hell of hunger, Nazi round-ups, humiliation and resistance. Films and books have in recent decades modified the cliché. The breathtaking colour series by André Zucca, a French photographer, show as never before a gay Paris that got on with life without great hardship.

Well-dressed citizens shop on the boulevards and stroll in the parks; young people crowd nightclubs; bikini-clad women bathe in the fashionable Deligny pool. The terraces of familiar cafés are crowded and commuters with briefcases march into the Métro.

The differences are the absent traffic, the Wehrmacht uniforms and red swastikas hanging from the grandest facades. In one sinister picture – taken in the street beside the gallery – an old woman wears a yellow Star of David, the insignia that Jews were forced to display. According to critics, the organisers at the Paris Historical Library neglected to make it clear that Zucca, a respected prewar photographer, was working for the German propaganda machine.

Pierre Assouline, a writer, said in Le Monde: “In the shadows of these same streets, they were dying of hunger and cold. Raids and torture were taking place. Here we see only relaxation, joie de vivre, the nonchalance of a kind of happiness.” Christophe Girard, the deputy mayor in charge of culture, said that he found the exhibition “em-barrassing, ambiguous and poorly explained”.

Jean Derens, the director of the library, rejected the criticism, saying that everyone knew the photographer was a collaborator: “If there is a visitor who is unaware of the nature of the occupation, it’s sad, but that does not mean that everything has to be reexplained every time.” He said that the critics were not content with his leaflet, which states: “Zucca portrays a casual, even carefree Paris. He has opted for a vision that does not show . . . the queues . . . the rounding-up of Jews, posters announcing executions.” The library praises the skill of Zucca, “who played on colours like an aesthete” and chronicled the occupation privately, using rare Agfacolor film supplied by the Wehrmacht. The sunny aspect of the photos stemmed from the need to shoot the early colour film in bright light, it adds.

The exhibition reminds viewers that Paris was relatively comfortable under the Nazis because Joseph Goebbels, Hitler’s propaganda chief, decreed that the capital should be “animated and gay” to show off the “new Europe”. Theatres and cinemas were kept busy; Edith Piaf sang, and Herbert von Karajan conducted.

The collection, restored to the original colour with digital techniques, was bought by the city from Zucca’s family in 1985. The photographer was arrested after the 1944 liberation but never prosecuted. He worked until his death in 1976 under an assumed name as a wedding photographer west of Paris.

— The exhibition is open every day except Mondays, 11am to 7pm, at the Bibliotheque Historique de la Ville de Paris. Lees meer ...



woensdag 16 april 2008

Nico Jesse Dutch Eyes in Berlin, London, Paris & Rome Photography

...to Jesse, photography was always a means of rendering human relationships visible...

Jesse, NicoMenschen in Berlin. Fotos von Nico Jesse. Einleitung von Franz Tumler. Im Bertelsmann Lesering. Gütersloh / Sigbert Mohn Verlag / 1960 / s. p. (120 S.) / geb. (HLwd.) / 24x19.7cm / s/w-Tiefdruckabb. / - / HCA mono / Buch / Photographie - Monographie - Deutschland, Berlin - 20. Jahrh. - Tumler, Fra










See also Leonard Freed in Berlin ... & Old Berlin ...





Nico Jesse Dutch Eyes in Berlin, London, Paris & Rome Photography

...to Jesse, photography was always a means of rendering human relationships visible...

Jesse, NicoMenschen in Berlin. Fotos von Nico Jesse. Einleitung von Franz Tumler. Im Bertelsmann Lesering. Gütersloh / Sigbert Mohn Verlag / 1960 / s. p. (120 S.) / geb. (HLwd.) / 24x19.7cm / s/w-Tiefdruckabb. / - / HCA mono / Buch / Photographie - Monographie - Deutschland, Berlin - 20. Jahrh. - Tumler, Fra










See also Leonard Freed in Berlin ... & Old Berlin ...





zaterdag 12 april 2008

William Klein & the French Goddess Citroën DS 19 Photography

Unanimite. Photographs by William Klein. Société Anonyme André Citroën/Delpire Publicité, Paris, n.d. (c. 1968) 20 pp. Stiff wrappers. Saddle stitched. Additional printed promotional card laid in. Color photographs.
Citroën--producers of among the most avant-garde auto designs ever marketed on a mainstream basis--always prided itself on its collaborations with artists, which over the years included Cartier-Bresson, Doisneau, Jean-Paul Goude, and Marc Riboud. For this late sixties catalogue, Klein honed in on the futuristic, aerodynamic design elements that made the DS (pronounced 'Déesse'--Goddess!) one of the most unique cars ever made. This early DS film is wonderful as well... Starting a 1957 Citroen DS 19 ... Read more ...

Four wheels in photographs: a snapshot

Shape, movement and light: just three of the many, many words that explain the love affair between photographers and the automobile. The first pictures taken by Jacques-Henri Lartigue as far back as 1910 reflect a passion for the object and its design, an interest in the people who design and build it, and a love of speed and motor sport. The world of automobiles and industry offers photographers an endless wealth of subjects, images, views and angles.

The exhibition of advertising photographs at the Paris Museum of Advertising, which is running until March 2007[1], highlights three pictures, taken by Jean-Paul Goude and André Martin in particular, offering an unusual vision of the automobile. The selection is representative of the photographer's vision of the motor car, the ideal object to illustrate shapes and forms and a symbol that expresses of all kinds of creativity.




Spotlight on style

"In the world of automotive photography, it is important to make the distinction between so-called advertising photographs that are used in catalogues or on posters and the photographs that illustrate communications materials, such as press kits and magazines," explains Patrick René, who is in charge of events in PSA Peugeot Citroën's media operations unit. "Advertising photographs are taken both in studios and outdoors and are usually the work of the agency's creative staff. Photographers can give full vent to their creativity when taking press photographs."There are always two possible approaches. The first consists in highlighting every aspect of the object itself. "Photographers like the Swiss Peter Vann1 often work in this way," explains Olivier de Serres, author of many works about the automobile2. "They simply photograph the car, with a minimalist decor."Enthusiasts tend to bring out the beauty of the car and highlight every one of its component parts using close-up shots. "With prestige vehicles, the car itself is the star, right down to the tiniest detail," explains Henri Beinert, a freelance photographer who regularly exhibits at the Schlumpf Collection in the "Cité de l’Automobile"3. "We take the time to seek out colours, shapes and reflections. I have been known to wait half an hour for a cloud to pass in order to find the right reflection on the bodywork." In this case, the image may be of an almost clinical precision, or, on the contrary, extravagantly stylised.

Life at the wheel, wheels come to life

The second approach consists in placing the vehicle in a spontaneous or carefully prepared context. From the famous holiday trips photographed by Doisneau to the speeding racing cars immortalised by Jacques-Henri Lartigue as far back as 1910, the goal is the same: to capture a moment or illustrate a dream in which the motor car plays an important role, but not necessarily the leading role. Some of Robert Doisneau's finest pictures illustrate the everyday life of workers in the Renault factory on the lle Seguin4, while Henri Cartier-Bresson is remembered for his images of the strikes at the Citroën factory on the Quai de Javel in 1938. Even the people who bring unfinished cars to life are a source of fascination for photographers.More recently, the Brazilian Sebastião Salgado, who has become one of the greatest photographers in the world, visited the PSA Peugeot Citroën style centre in the 1990s and took a surprising series of portraits of men and women at work. The automobile is almost entirely eclipsed by the look of concentration on their faces and the busy hands, hard at work.Amateur photographers will be reassured by the fact that some of the best pictures are flukes. "Jacques-Henri Lartigue's photograph is now thought to be a masterpiece, but to begin with it was considered to be quite poor," concludes Patrick René. "The history of photography shows that control does not always produce the best results." Arnold Odermatt, a lieutenant working in the Swiss police force, is another example of an inspired amateur. For years, he photographed his colleagues at work and road accidents (see his book "Karambolage"). Odermatt approaches this difficult subject with his Rolleifleix almost like a landscape artist. His work was discovered by the world of professional photography in the 1990s and he has since become one of the leading lights in Europe.


[1] "Advertising photography in France, from Man Ray to Jean-Paul Goude", November 8, 2006 to March 25, 2007, Paris Museum of Advertising (www.museedelapub.org).
1Photographer for Mercedes, Volkswagen, Porsche, etc.
2Latest publication: “Citroën DS: au Panthéon de l'automobile”, Anthese, September, 2005.
3www.collection-schlumpf.com. Henri Beinert's work was exhibited at the "Salon des Artistes de l'Automobile" in December, 2006.
4"Le Renault de Doisneau", Robert Doisneau and Claire Stoullig, Somogy - Editions d'Art

William Klein & the French Goddess Citroën DS 19 Photography

Unanimite. Photographs by William Klein. Société Anonyme André Citroën/Delpire Publicité, Paris, n.d. (c. 1968) 20 pp. Stiff wrappers. Saddle stitched. Additional printed promotional card laid in. Color photographs.
Citroën--producers of among the most avant-garde auto designs ever marketed on a mainstream basis--always prided itself on its collaborations with artists, which over the years included Cartier-Bresson, Doisneau, Jean-Paul Goude, and Marc Riboud. For this late sixties catalogue, Klein honed in on the futuristic, aerodynamic design elements that made the DS (pronounced 'Déesse'--Goddess!) one of the most unique cars ever made. This early DS film is wonderful as well... Starting a 1957 Citroen DS 19 ... Read more ...

Four wheels in photographs: a snapshot

Shape, movement and light: just three of the many, many words that explain the love affair between photographers and the automobile. The first pictures taken by Jacques-Henri Lartigue as far back as 1910 reflect a passion for the object and its design, an interest in the people who design and build it, and a love of speed and motor sport. The world of automobiles and industry offers photographers an endless wealth of subjects, images, views and angles.

The exhibition of advertising photographs at the Paris Museum of Advertising, which is running until March 2007[1], highlights three pictures, taken by Jean-Paul Goude and André Martin in particular, offering an unusual vision of the automobile. The selection is representative of the photographer's vision of the motor car, the ideal object to illustrate shapes and forms and a symbol that expresses of all kinds of creativity.




Spotlight on style

"In the world of automotive photography, it is important to make the distinction between so-called advertising photographs that are used in catalogues or on posters and the photographs that illustrate communications materials, such as press kits and magazines," explains Patrick René, who is in charge of events in PSA Peugeot Citroën's media operations unit. "Advertising photographs are taken both in studios and outdoors and are usually the work of the agency's creative staff. Photographers can give full vent to their creativity when taking press photographs."There are always two possible approaches. The first consists in highlighting every aspect of the object itself. "Photographers like the Swiss Peter Vann1 often work in this way," explains Olivier de Serres, author of many works about the automobile2. "They simply photograph the car, with a minimalist decor."Enthusiasts tend to bring out the beauty of the car and highlight every one of its component parts using close-up shots. "With prestige vehicles, the car itself is the star, right down to the tiniest detail," explains Henri Beinert, a freelance photographer who regularly exhibits at the Schlumpf Collection in the "Cité de l’Automobile"3. "We take the time to seek out colours, shapes and reflections. I have been known to wait half an hour for a cloud to pass in order to find the right reflection on the bodywork." In this case, the image may be of an almost clinical precision, or, on the contrary, extravagantly stylised.

Life at the wheel, wheels come to life

The second approach consists in placing the vehicle in a spontaneous or carefully prepared context. From the famous holiday trips photographed by Doisneau to the speeding racing cars immortalised by Jacques-Henri Lartigue as far back as 1910, the goal is the same: to capture a moment or illustrate a dream in which the motor car plays an important role, but not necessarily the leading role. Some of Robert Doisneau's finest pictures illustrate the everyday life of workers in the Renault factory on the lle Seguin4, while Henri Cartier-Bresson is remembered for his images of the strikes at the Citroën factory on the Quai de Javel in 1938. Even the people who bring unfinished cars to life are a source of fascination for photographers.More recently, the Brazilian Sebastião Salgado, who has become one of the greatest photographers in the world, visited the PSA Peugeot Citroën style centre in the 1990s and took a surprising series of portraits of men and women at work. The automobile is almost entirely eclipsed by the look of concentration on their faces and the busy hands, hard at work.Amateur photographers will be reassured by the fact that some of the best pictures are flukes. "Jacques-Henri Lartigue's photograph is now thought to be a masterpiece, but to begin with it was considered to be quite poor," concludes Patrick René. "The history of photography shows that control does not always produce the best results." Arnold Odermatt, a lieutenant working in the Swiss police force, is another example of an inspired amateur. For years, he photographed his colleagues at work and road accidents (see his book "Karambolage"). Odermatt approaches this difficult subject with his Rolleifleix almost like a landscape artist. His work was discovered by the world of professional photography in the 1990s and he has since become one of the leading lights in Europe.


[1] "Advertising photography in France, from Man Ray to Jean-Paul Goude", November 8, 2006 to March 25, 2007, Paris Museum of Advertising (www.museedelapub.org).
1Photographer for Mercedes, Volkswagen, Porsche, etc.
2Latest publication: “Citroën DS: au Panthéon de l'automobile”, Anthese, September, 2005.
3www.collection-schlumpf.com. Henri Beinert's work was exhibited at the "Salon des Artistes de l'Automobile" in December, 2006.
4"Le Renault de Doisneau", Robert Doisneau and Claire Stoullig, Somogy - Editions d'Art

donderdag 10 april 2008

the Photobook Photography Auction April 2008 Christie's Sotheby's

Top 10 Sotheby's :

1. $1,609,000 / $600,000 - 900,000 Pace MacGill Gallery Edward Weston, Nude, 1925 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

2. $645,800 / $600,000 - 900,000 Pace MacGill Galelry Paul Strand, Rebecca, 1923 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

This exceptionally open, intimate portrait of Rebecca Strand is one of more than a hundred that Paul Strand made of his wife between 1920 and 1932. The series was so strongly influenced by Alfred Stieglitz's celebrated extended portrait of his wife, Georgia O'Keeffe, that Strand's parallel project, pursued in close contact with his friend and mentor, may be considered an implicit act of homage.

Strand's long artistic apprenticeship to Stieglitz, begun through visits to Stieglitz's gallery in 1913, came to an end with the suite of portraits he took of Rebecca in 1922–23. Whereas his earlier attempts appear strained because their long exposures required a headrest—the "iron virgin" of the studio practice—in 1922 Strand photographed his wife in bed. The removal of the former constraint and the new, supine position allowed Strand to reject the upright format of traditional portraiture and to frame boldly, solely to the dictates of his desire. The artist's freedom and his model's relaxation, intensified by their deep emotional bond, resulted in a portrait of extraordinary sensitivity and immediacy—a fresh but assured response to svelte formal elegance.

3. $493,000 / $150,000 - 250,000 Anonymous August Sander, Werkstudenten, 1926 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

4. $457,000 / $70,000 - 100,000 Anonymous Richard Avedon, Marilyn Monroe, May 6, 1957, New York City *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*
By Laurie Boeder :
It's not sexy. Not nude. Not glamorous, flirtatious, outrageous, audacious, or playful.
It's just sad. Lovely and sad.
Richard Avedon's indelible portrait of an actress whose public persona has slipped in a weary moment provides a glimpse of what it cost Marilyn Monroe to be Marilyn Monroe. The pretty shoulders are slumped, yet still tense. The light and the energy have gone out of her. She stares at something invisible and inevitable in the middle distance. She seems both resigned and apprehensive, as if she sees her own future.
The heartbreaking photo, "Marilyn Monroe, May 6, 1957" sold in a Sotheby's auction in New York this week for $457,000, far above the pre-auction estimate of $70,000. It was taken at the end of a long shoot in which the actress smiled, flirted and posed in her usual sex-kitten persona (although the shots, some of which are seen in
this montage, have a whiff of desperation about them.)
Then Avedon pointed the camera at her one last time. Maybe she was just tired. But because we know the tragedy to come, the portrait takes on power. It remains one of the most famous Hollywood portraits of all time.
5. $325,000 / $200,000 - 300,000 American Private Hans Bellmer, La Poupée (The Doll), circa 1935 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*


6. $313,000 / $60,000 - 90,000 Pace MacGill Gallery Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #53, 1980

7. $301,000 / $150,000 - 250,000 Anonymous László Moholy-Nagy, Photogram, 1920s *RECORD FOR A PHOTOGRAPH BY THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

8. $289,000 / $50,000 - 70,000 American Private Dorothea Lange, San Francisco Waterfront, 1933

One of the 20th century's most gifted photographers, Dorothea Lange's documentary activity began in the early 1930s, when she gave up commercial portrait photography and went into the streets to record labor unrest and the effects of unemployment during the Great Depression. Her best known work was done during a five-year period from 1935-39, when she worked for the Resettlement Administration (later Farm Security Administration), portraying hungry migrant workers, sharecroppers, and tenant farmers without jobs and homes. In this portrayal of striking laborers, Lange concentrated on gesture and expression to convey the disillusionment of the time.

9. $265,000 / $50,000 - 70,000 Anonymous Bill Brandt, Van Gogh's Room in the Asylum of St. Paul-de-Mausole (St. Rémy), 1950 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*
10 $265,000 / $150,000 - 250,000 American Private Carleton E. Watkins, Tasayac, Half Dome from Glacier Point, Yosemite, 1865-66



the Photobook Photography Auction April 2008 Christie's Sotheby's

Top 10 Sotheby's :

1. $1,609,000 / $600,000 - 900,000 Pace MacGill Gallery Edward Weston, Nude, 1925 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

2. $645,800 / $600,000 - 900,000 Pace MacGill Galelry Paul Strand, Rebecca, 1923 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

This exceptionally open, intimate portrait of Rebecca Strand is one of more than a hundred that Paul Strand made of his wife between 1920 and 1932. The series was so strongly influenced by Alfred Stieglitz's celebrated extended portrait of his wife, Georgia O'Keeffe, that Strand's parallel project, pursued in close contact with his friend and mentor, may be considered an implicit act of homage.

Strand's long artistic apprenticeship to Stieglitz, begun through visits to Stieglitz's gallery in 1913, came to an end with the suite of portraits he took of Rebecca in 1922–23. Whereas his earlier attempts appear strained because their long exposures required a headrest—the "iron virgin" of the studio practice—in 1922 Strand photographed his wife in bed. The removal of the former constraint and the new, supine position allowed Strand to reject the upright format of traditional portraiture and to frame boldly, solely to the dictates of his desire. The artist's freedom and his model's relaxation, intensified by their deep emotional bond, resulted in a portrait of extraordinary sensitivity and immediacy—a fresh but assured response to svelte formal elegance.

3. $493,000 / $150,000 - 250,000 Anonymous August Sander, Werkstudenten, 1926 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

4. $457,000 / $70,000 - 100,000 Anonymous Richard Avedon, Marilyn Monroe, May 6, 1957, New York City *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*
By Laurie Boeder :
It's not sexy. Not nude. Not glamorous, flirtatious, outrageous, audacious, or playful.
It's just sad. Lovely and sad.
Richard Avedon's indelible portrait of an actress whose public persona has slipped in a weary moment provides a glimpse of what it cost Marilyn Monroe to be Marilyn Monroe. The pretty shoulders are slumped, yet still tense. The light and the energy have gone out of her. She stares at something invisible and inevitable in the middle distance. She seems both resigned and apprehensive, as if she sees her own future.
The heartbreaking photo, "Marilyn Monroe, May 6, 1957" sold in a Sotheby's auction in New York this week for $457,000, far above the pre-auction estimate of $70,000. It was taken at the end of a long shoot in which the actress smiled, flirted and posed in her usual sex-kitten persona (although the shots, some of which are seen in
this montage, have a whiff of desperation about them.)
Then Avedon pointed the camera at her one last time. Maybe she was just tired. But because we know the tragedy to come, the portrait takes on power. It remains one of the most famous Hollywood portraits of all time.
5. $325,000 / $200,000 - 300,000 American Private Hans Bellmer, La Poupée (The Doll), circa 1935 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*


6. $313,000 / $60,000 - 90,000 Pace MacGill Gallery Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #53, 1980

7. $301,000 / $150,000 - 250,000 Anonymous László Moholy-Nagy, Photogram, 1920s *RECORD FOR A PHOTOGRAPH BY THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*

8. $289,000 / $50,000 - 70,000 American Private Dorothea Lange, San Francisco Waterfront, 1933

One of the 20th century's most gifted photographers, Dorothea Lange's documentary activity began in the early 1930s, when she gave up commercial portrait photography and went into the streets to record labor unrest and the effects of unemployment during the Great Depression. Her best known work was done during a five-year period from 1935-39, when she worked for the Resettlement Administration (later Farm Security Administration), portraying hungry migrant workers, sharecroppers, and tenant farmers without jobs and homes. In this portrayal of striking laborers, Lange concentrated on gesture and expression to convey the disillusionment of the time.

9. $265,000 / $50,000 - 70,000 Anonymous Bill Brandt, Van Gogh's Room in the Asylum of St. Paul-de-Mausole (St. Rémy), 1950 *RECORD FOR THE ARTIST AT AUCTION*
10 $265,000 / $150,000 - 250,000 American Private Carleton E. Watkins, Tasayac, Half Dome from Glacier Point, Yosemite, 1865-66