vrijdag 27 juli 2012

Walking in a shuffleboard Achterland Hans van der Meer Photography


Titel: Achterland / [fotogr. en tekst] Hans van der Meer
Auteur: Hans van der Meer (1955-)
Jaar: 2004
Editie: 1e dr
Uitgever: Amsterdam : De Verbeelding
Annotatie: Gedeeltelijk eerder verschenen in: NRC Handelsblad
Omvang: 76 p. : foto's. ; 16Ã-24 cm
ISBN: 90-74159-74-5


Photographer Hans van der Meer made ​​a trip for NRC Handelsblad through the Netherlands. His observations, in words and pictures are often funny, sometimes sad and occasionally poetic. Is this our country? Are we this? The enigmatic Achterland.


Hans van der Meer Hollandse velden 
"Hans van der Meer is a very good Dutch photographer. Dutch Fields is very impressive - it is a combination of sports photography and landscape photography. It shows a sort of small intimacy of amateur football - with humor. It is just a great book, very original!'
- Martin Parr, Magnum Photographer

Hans van der Meer (Leimuiden, 1955) between 1973-76 he studied at MTS voor Fotografie te Den Haag and between 1983-86 he studied photography at Rijksakademie voor Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. Between 1984 and 1986 he photographed streetscenes in Budapest. These pictures were published in the album Quirk of the Fate (Bert Bakker, 1987, 50 photographs, b&w). In 1987 the series won a price in the category Daily Life of World Press Photo. In 1989 Hans van der Meer worked for 3 week in the world-famous balletschool Agrippina Vaganova of St. Petersburg, on the assignment of the Holland Festival. Between 1991 and 1993 he photographed the workers from various factories in Holland. His pictures highlight that in a modern technological society the expression "labour" has lost a lot of its originally physical meaning. In 1993 over 80 b&w photographs of his were published in the album Werk. In 1994 he worked on a series panorama-photographs in b&w of Amsterdam traffic. The pictures were exhibited in 1995 during the Fotofestival Naarden. Later that year they were shown in the Amsterdam Local Archive. In July 2000 De Verbeelding published the series: Amsterdam Traffic, 32 b&w panoramas. On assignment of the Academisch Ziekenhuis Groningen, in 1996 he photographed the city of Groningen. The panoramas in colour formed part of the album Groningen van A tot Z (Paradox, 1997). In September 1995 he started taking photographs of low division amateur-soccer games. He went out looking for football in its original form, as it started more than a hundred years ago: a piece of land, 22 players, no spectators around the pitch, just a horse in the next meadow. The image is far away from the image we know from professional football. The first edition of the album Hollandse Velden (De Verbeelding, 1998, 58 photographs, colour) came out during the World Cup in France, 1998, and the photographs were exhibited during the World Cup, at the Institut Néerlandais in Paris. In December 1998 the Hollandse Velden exhibition was presented in the Nederlands Foto Insituut in Rotterdam. In September 1999 Hans van der Meer was invited by the Centro Portugues de Fotografia to take panorama photographs in Porto. His contemporary images of the city formed part of the exhibition Rondom Porto in the Kunsthal in Rotterdam, March-April 2000. In October 1999 the photographer did a project about bicycles in Beijing, China. His panoramas and his videofilms are presented in June 2000 in Amsterdam and in 2001 in Beijing.












donderdag 26 juli 2012

The rise of Prosperity in gray Snapshots Before Color William Eggleston Photography


Before Color


William Eggleston

Nederlands Fotomuseum 16.JUN.2012_26.AUG.2012
The American photographer William Eggleston (1939) is known as one of the first major pioneers of artistic colour photography. His book William Eggleston's Guide was one of the most influential photography books of the 20th century and still inspires many today. Eggleston's black-and-white photographs are less well-known. In Before Color, the Nederlands Fotomuseum highlights this famous photographer's earliest work, which was only recently discovered.

The photographs show that Eggleston found his own style early on. Inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eggleston used a 35mm camera and fast black-and-white film to photograph the American way of life in the early 1960s. We see his own surroundings: suburban Memphis, with its diners, car parks and supermarkets, as well as the houses and domestic interiors of the people who lived there. Before Color by William Eggleston will be on display from 16 June until 26 August.

untitled-egg_ph-046.jpg
Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York and Peter Lund, Oslo © Eggleston Artistic Trust, Photo Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York



Breaking a tradition
At the same time Eggleston experimented with colour photography. Together with Joel Meyerowitz, Joel Sternfeld and others, he broke the long tradition of black-and-white photography by working in colour and focusing on subjects from daily life. In 1972 he completed an extensive series of 2,200 photographs entitled Los Alamos, which provided a unique picture of life in America in the '60s and early '70s. He discovered the deep and saturated colours of the so-called dye-transfer printing technique, originally a commercial application that he perfected and that would become his international trademark. His first solo exhibition in 1976 was also the first exhibition in the Museum of Modern Art devoted to colour photography. The exhibition was accompanied by what would become the acclaimed and influential book William Eggleston's Guide.

“As these rediscovered prints reveal, the man who made colour photography into an artform worked brilliantly in monochrome – and his eye for unsettling detail is every bit as sharp” – Sean O’Hagan, The Guardian

Before colour
Eggleston would later abandon black-and-white film altogether and his earliest work was forgotten. So it was a surprise when a box of his black-and-white photographs was recently found in the archives of the William Eggleston Artistic Trust in Memphis. The photographs were exhibited for the first time in 2010 at the Cheim & Read Gallery in New York and published in the book Before Color (Steidl, 2010).


Book Before Color | William Eggleston | Steidl | € 48,- | ISBN 978-3-86930-122-8

See also: www.egglestontrust.com






woensdag 4 juli 2012

Cor Jaring Dit Hap Hap Happens in Amsterdam The Dutch Photobook Graphic Design Photography


JARING, COR Dit Hap Hap Happens in Amsterdam

Amsterdam, Arbeiders Pers, 1966. first edition. Softcover. 24x17. Great Lay-out Happenings & actions by Johnny 'the Selfkicker' van Doorn (= 'Jezus Electronic'), Simon Vinkenoog, Bart Huges (= 'Het derde oog'), Robert Jasper Grootveld (= 'Anti-rook magier'). Subjects like 'Stoned in the street', 'Goed dat er politie is!!!?!' with photos by Cor Jaring.


The Dutch Photobook describes the relatively recent history of the famed Dutch photobook. Editors Rik Suermondt and Frits Gierstberg chose over 120 of the most significant Dutch photobooks and placed them in the context of developments in photography and society.

The post-Second World War Dutch photobook is unique because of the long tradition of graphic designers and photographers working closely together. It is highly prized abroad, and many photobooks have become part of the collections of museums and private collectors. This book shows the immense variety and allure of the Dutch photobook and makes it accessible to a broad audience.
Six chapters, organized both thematically and chronologically, examine company photobooks , photobooks about youth culture, landscape books, city books, travelogues and autonomous photobooks. For each theme, the 20 most noteworthy books are described and represented by gorgeous illustrations of their covers and parts of their contents.
Despite - or perhaps because - the digitization of photography, the traditional medium of the photo book is (still) enormously popular amongst contemporary photographers. They see the book as the ideal form to present their work and to tell their story. The Dutch photo book has built over the years a certain reputation. The close collaboration between graphic designers and photographers determined in the period after 1945 the quality of the Dutch photo books. Gerry Badger wrote: ": ‘One of the most active photobook cultures in the postwar years was Holland, rivalling and perhaps exceeding even France.” 








dinsdag 3 juli 2012

Hans Werlemann Rotterdams Kadeboek The Dutch Photobook Photography


WERLEMANN, HANS - Rotterdams Kadeboek

Rotterdam, Uitgeverij 010. 1983, Eerste Druk. (ISBN: 90-6450-003-7). Oorspronkelijk Omslag. Een compleet en aaneengesloten beeld van Rotterdam en haar havens in ruim 500 foto's. Foto's van Hans Werlemann en Alan David-Tu. Oblong, 515 pp.

Hans Werlemannis an architectural photographer closely involved with, among others, Rem Koolhaas and his Office for Metropolitan Architecture. Werlemann is fascinated with the density of the Dutch urban landscape and has published his work widely and lectured on the tension between documentary and art education. 


The Dutch Photobook describes the relatively recent history of the famed Dutch photobook. Editors Rik Suermondt and Frits Gierstberg chose over 120 of the most significant Dutch photobooks and placed them in the context of developments in photography and society.

The post-Second World War Dutch photobook is unique because of the long tradition of graphic designers and photographers working closely together. It is highly prized abroad, and many photobooks have become part of the collections of museums and private collectors. This book shows the immense variety and allure of the Dutch photobook and makes it accessible to a broad audience.
Six chapters, organized both thematically and chronologically, examine company photobooks , photobooks about youth culture, landscape books, city books, travelogues and autonomous photobooks. For each theme, the 20 most noteworthy books are described and represented by gorgeous illustrations of their covers and parts of their contents.
Despite - or perhaps because - the digitization of photography, the traditional medium of the photo book is (still) enormously popular amongst contemporary photographers. They see the book as the ideal form to present their work and to tell their story. The Dutch photo book has built over the years a certain reputation. The close collaboration between graphic designers and photographers determined in the period after 1945 the quality of the Dutch photo books. Gerry Badger wrote: ": ‘One of the most active photobook cultures in the postwar years was Holland, rivalling and perhaps exceeding even France.” 

maandag 2 juli 2012

Cuny Janssen Macedonia: Portraits and Landscapes The Dutch Photobook Parr Badger Graphic Design Photography

Cuny Janssen

Macedonia: Portraits and Landscapes

GERMANY Schaden.com, Cologne. 2004. First edition, first printing. Martin Parr, The Photobook , vol 2, page 53,87. Brilliant book! 242 x 194 mm (9 1/2 x 7 1/2 in), 28 pages. Hardback with padded cover. 42 colour photographs, including 1 gatefold. Text by Paul Andriesse; design by SYB Utrecht.



The Dutch Photobook describes the relatively recent history of the famed Dutch photobook. Editors Rik Suermondt and Frits Gierstberg chose over 120 of the most significant Dutch photobooks and placed them in the context of developments in photography and society.

The post-Second World War Dutch photobook is unique because of the long tradition of graphic designers and photographers working closely together. It is highly prized abroad, and many photobooks have become part of the collections of museums and private collectors. This book shows the immense variety and allure of the Dutch photobook and makes it accessible to a broad audience.
Six chapters, organized both thematically and chronologically, examine company photobooks , photobooks about youth culture, landscape books, city books, travelogues and autonomous photobooks. For each theme, the 20 most noteworthy books are described and represented by gorgeous illustrations of their covers and parts of their contents.
Despite - or perhaps because - the digitization of photography, the traditional medium of the photo book is (still) enormously popular amongst contemporary photographers. They see the book as the ideal form to present their work and to tell their story. The Dutch photo book has built over the years a certain reputation. The close collaboration between graphic designers and photographers determined in the period after 1945 the quality of the Dutch photo books. Gerry Badger wrote: ": ‘One of the most active photobook cultures in the postwar years was Holland, rivalling and perhaps exceeding even France.” 
Cuny Janssen

Dutch photographer, Cuny Janssen's (b. 1975) portraits of children and young people offer a fresh perspective on both the medium and method of photographic portraiture. In the light of this, developing and responding to contemporary social as well as artistic challenges form the crux of her practice.Based in Utrecht, Janssen's work has taken her to locations including Norway, Macedonia, Iran, India and the UK. Her creative influences are equally diverse, ranging from Marcel Proust to contemporary artist Thomas Struth, and from photographer Robert Adams to the Swiss 19th-century painter Ferdinand Hodler. Her in-depth familiarity with their work has become an important element of her development as an artist.Janssen's interest in the medium of books began in 2002 with a publication of images of children and young people in India. However, the true beginnings of her portraits and landscapes series came with her photographic approach to portraying children in areas of conflict. Janssen went to Macedonia in 2003 when ethnic violence was sporadic and many families were (and remain) displaced from their homes.Cuny Janssen is not an opportunistic artist. Her working process starts with the discipline of a plate camera and ends with a very careful edit long after the photograph has been taken. Her portraits come about through long periods of time spent with sitters and their families although the specific names of her sitters are not identified in the final works. Her photographs are neither snapshots nor formally poised moments. Alluding to a rich history of the portrait in art, her colour images actively engage in the quandaries of the portrait as psychological space and philosophical construct.Both the photographs of landscapes and children, juxtaposed without textual interpretation, carry an ambiguous undercurrent of expectancy and stasis in equal measure. We might relate them to Proust's concept of "extra-temporalisation", meaning literally "a place out of time".Overall, Janssen's practice has positive connotations; her ostensible subjects are of young lives and unspoiled nature. Combined with the children's resilience and the displaced feeling of the landscapes, Janssen's project emerges as a highly contemplative body of work, encouraging an optimistic reading of the enduring truths of survival and beauty.The artist's book "Finding Thoughts" is co-published by The Photographers' Gallery and Cuny Janssen.

Cuny Janssen (1975)
Cuny Janssen portretteerde kinderen uit Nederland, India, Noorwegen, Macedonië en Iran. In het voorwoord van Janssens' fotoboek Macedonia worden haar beweegredenen als volgt omschreven: 'Cuny Janssen fotografeert kinderen. Dat doet ze met een doel. Ze wil laten zien dat kinderen waar ook ter wereld, ondanks alle topografische, historische en culturele verschillen, in essentie gelijk zijn. In haar fotografische portretten gaat het om de universele gelijkheid van de mens*.'Nadat Janssen de tweede prijs van de Prix de Rome wint in 2002, krijgt haar werk een andere invalshoek. Ze zegt: 'Voor 2002 wilde ik alleen kinderen in schijnbaar normale omstandigheden fotograferen, omdat ik dacht dat extreme situaties de aandacht zouden afleiden van waar het in mijn beelden om gaat. Dit was dan ook mijn eerste reactie op het advies van jurylid Oliviero Toscani om oorlogskinderen te gaan fotograferen. In mijn gedachten zag ik alleen maar trauma's voor me en dat is niet wat ik wil laten zien. Maar na een jaar heb ik besloten om zijn advies op te volgen, simpelweg door van mijn stelling een vraag te maken. Krijg ik dan alleen maar trauma's te zien? Ik besloot toen om toch binnen zo'n extreme situatie contact te krijgen met het kind en om me te concentreren op de kracht, de waarde van de mens.'* Janssen vertrekt naar Macedonià en ontmoet in vluchtlingenkampen en opvangcentra kinderen van onder andere Macedonische, Albanese en Roma-zigeuner afkomst, die in 2001 getuige waren van het conflict dat uitbrak tussen Albanese rebellen en de regering. De reis resulteert in een serie van zestien intrigerende portretten. Tevens maakt ze indrukwekkende foto's van het Macedonische landschap, waarin stilte, tijdloosheid en licht regeren. Janssen: 'een portret is voor mij net zo goed een landschap en andersom. Er loopt een rode draad door mijn beleving van de mens en mijn beleving van de natuur.


zondag 1 juli 2012

Cor van Weele en alles daartussen The Dutch Photobook Photography


Titel:En alles daartussen / Foto's: Cor van Weele ; Opmerkingen: Ad de Vries
Medewerker:WeeleCor van 
Vries, Ad de
Annotatie:hoofdz. foto's 
Uitgever:Zaandijk : Heijnis
Beschrijving:103 p
22×22 cm


The Dutch Photobook describes the relatively recent history of the famed Dutch photobook. Editors Rik Suermondt and Frits Gierstberg chose over 120 of the most significant Dutch photobooks and placed them in the context of developments in photography and society.
The post-Second World War Dutch photobook is unique because of the long tradition of graphic designers and photographers working closely together. It is highly prized abroad, and many photobooks have become part of the collections of museums and private collectors. This book shows the immense variety and allure of the Dutch photobook and makes it accessible to a broad audience.
Six chapters, organized both thematically and chronologically, examine company photobooks , photobooks about youth culture, landscape books, city books, travelogues and autonomous photobooks. For each theme, the 20 most noteworthy books are described and represented by gorgeous illustrations of their covers and parts of their contents.
Despite - or perhaps because - the digitization of photography, the traditional medium of the photo book is (still) enormously popular amongst contemporary photographers. They see the book as the ideal form to present their work and to tell their story. The Dutch photo book has built over the years a certain reputation. The close collaboration between graphic designers and photographers determined in the period after 1945 the quality of the Dutch photo books. Gerry Badger wrote: ": ‘One of the most active photobook cultures in the postwar years was Holland, rivalling and perhaps exceeding even France.” 
Fotolexicon, 3e jaargang, nr. 4 (maart 1986) (nl)Tineke de Ruiter: Cor van Weele
Een andere inspiratiebron voor Van Weele vormden de tentoonstellingen Subjektive Fotografie I en II, die in 1951 en 1954 door Otto Steinert werden georganiseerd. De groep fotografen achter deze tentoonstellingen werden in hun motiefkeuze beïnvloed door de naoorlogse abstracte schilderkunst. Ook in Van Weele's fotografie ligt in deze periode de nadruk op de vormgeving, een zekere mate van abstractie en een sterke zwart-wit werking. Hij beschouwt deze uitingen echter niet als eindresultaten maar als vingeroefeningen, zegt hij in een interview in 1955.
Van Weele heeft zijn fotografische visie bovendien ontwikkeld door contacten met architecten, psychologen, filosofen en andere wetenschappers. In de jaren vijftig raakte hij bevriend met prof. Reichling, toenmalig hoogleraar Algemene Taalwetenschap in Amsterdam. Gesprekken met Reichling hebben Van Weele al in een vroeg stadium overtuigd van de kracht van de fotografie als visuele taal. Latere contacten met prof. Peters, docent op de Filmacademie, hebben een semiologische benadering van de fotografie bij hem versterkt. Experimenten met de 'Eye-marker', een apparaat waarmee het proces van waarneming onderzocht kan worden, brachten Van Weele tot zijn credo: „Ieder mens ziet evenveel, maar heeft zijn eigen herkenning naar vorm en inhoud. Van de veelheid die tot ons komt is slechts een gedeelte dat wij waarnemen."
De filosofische benadering van fotografie als taal is in de vormgeving van Van Weele's fotografie duidelijk te herkennen. Zo bouwt de fotograaf vaak bewust een dubbele bodem in en werkt hij met associaties en beeldrijm. Het is zijn overtuiging dat een fotografisch beeld niets overbodig mag bevatten en dat een fotograaf daarom moet abstraheren. „Als je het overal over hebt, heb je het nergens over." Een gevolg van de behoefte aan abstractie is de grote aandacht voor lijn en vlakverdeling en een reductie van grijstonen. Onbelangrijke details laat hij „in het zwart zakken". Het gebruik van contrasten herhalingen, vorm en tegenvorm of juist congruentie en symmetrie door schaduwen en reflecties bepaalt vaak de opbouw van zijn foto's.
Cor van Weele is als portretfotograaf begonnen en dit genre heeft lange tijd zijn voorkeur gehouden. Opgeleid bij Nederlandse portretfotografen als Godfried de Groot en Willy Schurman kwam hij in contact met de internationale portretkunst. De bewondering van met name Godfried de Groot voor de Amerikaanse glamourfotografie deelde Van Weele echter niet; hij keek alleen naar de Duitse portretschool met haar aandacht voor de beeldopbouw. Geposeerde, zeer goed bestudeerde en uitgelichte portretten zijn het resultaat van de opleiding die Van Weele heeft gehad. Ook nu nog werkt hij het liefst met kunstlicht, waarbij hij eigenzinnige uitgangspunten hanteert. Zo houdt hij de rechtermondhoek van zijn zitters vaak in de schaduw, omdat wat hij noemt de „maskertrekken", de nerveuze en onsympathieke trekken zich in het algemeen daar concentreren. Ook houdt hij vast aan de belichtingstijd van drie seconden voor een portret. Zijns inziens is dat de enige juiste uitsnede uit de tijd om een karakteristieke uitdrukking in de ogen vast te leggen. Hij gebruikt bij portretten nog steeds de ouderwetse gummidrukbal, omdat hij zo het moment van de afdruk beter kan bepalen.
Vanzelfsprekend zijn in zijn portretfotografie belichting, posen en entourage in de loop der tijd aan veranderingen onderhevig geweest. Populaire en bewonderde reclame- en filmfoto's dwongen de fotograaf zijn stijl aan te passen. Zo gebruikte Van Weele enige tijd harde spotlights om het filmlicht en de zware schaduwen, die bijvoorbeeld in de film noir gebruikt werden, te imiteren.
In de jaren vijftig maakte hij portretten met zorgvuldig gekozen achtergronden, zoals een mooi ontworpen kleed of schaduwen van takken. De ruimte rond de zitters vulde hij in met attributen en aanduidingen die een persoonlijke sfeer versterkten. Deze vroege portretten fotografeerde hij op formaat 13x18 cm en een 50 cm lens. Hij gebruikte het lange brandpunt vanwege de plastiek die de geringe scherptediepte opleverde. In latere portretten, die hij met een kleinbeeld maakt, ligt de nadruk niet meer zozeer op de pose en de omgeving als wel op de kop zelf. Het model wordt van zeer dichtbij gefotografeerd. Gezichtslijnen en mimiek bepalen op een indringende manier het contact tussen beschouwer en geportretteerde, zoals bij de portretten van mevrouw Calderara en Wessel Couzijn.
Diplomaten, gezanten, kunstenaars, schrijvers en andere bekende en onbekende Nederlanders hebben in de loop der jaren voor Van Weele geposeerd.
Een echte reportagefotograaf is Cor van Weele niet te noemen. Uit zijn foto's spreken eerder een geest van bezinning en een secundair reactievermogen dan het handelen van een snel en primair reagerend fotograaf. Wel heeft Van Weele bezetenheid en vasthoudendheid gemeen met de reportagefotograaf.
Zo maakte hij tijdens zijn krijgsgevangenschap illegale opnamen van zijn kampgenoten en fotografeerde hij eens de artsen nog vlak voor het moment waarop hij voor een operatie onder narcose ging. Door die gedrevenheid krijgen de weliswaar verstilde foto's dan toch enigszins een reportage- karakter.
In opdracht van de Amsterdamse Doopsgezinde Gemeente fotografeerde hij vluchtelingenkampen in Duitsland en maakte hij reportages in Goes en Zierikzee. Samenwerking met journalisten als Wim Alings en Gui Fortgens heeft geleid tot een groot aantal reisreportages, die in bladen als Televizier en Eigen Huis & Interieur zijn gepubliceerd.
Vele Nederlandse musea, kunstenaars en architecten zijn opdrachtgever geweest van Cor van Weele, die als fotograaf om zijn grote vakmanschap bekend staat. Een groot aantal kunstcatalogi zijn dan ook gevuld met de reproducties die Van Weele van schilderijen en tekeningen maakte.
In de jaren zeventig kreeg hij een opdracht van Ger van Elk. Deze vroeg hem de opnamen te maken van figurerende 'diplomaten' voor zijn Missing Persons. De kunstenaar liet daarna een van de aanwezigen in het groepsportret als 'persona non grata' wegretoucheren.
Opnamen voor architecten en beeldhouwers zijn vanzelfsprekend minder reproductief van aard dan opnamen van schilderijen en tekeningen, daar de fotograaf meer kans krijgt om te interpreteren. Bij Van Weele's opnamen spelen de vormgeving en de detaillering van gebouwen en een belangrijkere rol dan de aanwezigheid van mensen in die ruimten.
Van Weele heeft met bijna alle cameraformaten gewerkt, een uitgesproken voorkeur voor bepaalde formaten heeft hij nu niet meer. Wel was hij in de jaren vijftig en zestig lange tijd aan het vierkante formaat (6x6) gehecht. Kenmerkend voor een fotograaf als hij die elk onderdeel van het beeld van te voren in het matglas of door de zoeker bepaalt, is het gebruik van het hele negatief.
In de doka werkt hij met een eigengemaakte ontwikkelaar, een geconcentreerde oplossing gebaseerd op een recept uit de vorige eeuw. In deze oplossing verloopt het proces zeer snel, waardoor zijn drukken krachtig zijn. Al in 1937 heeft Van Weele geëxperimenteerd met Agfa Color Neue-film. Daar de kleuren die de industrie kon leveren hem niet voldeden, is hij echter snel weer overgestapt op zwart-wit werk. Sinds eind jaren zestig werkt hij weer met kleur. Nu echter gebruikt hij diamateriaal en laat de vakhandel er afdrukken van maken.
Al sinds het begin van de jaren vijftig houdt Cor van Weele zich bezig met het overdragen van zijn vakkennis. Zijn opvattingen over fotografie draagt hij uit in de vakpers, door middel van lezingen en vooral door het opleiden van jongeren. In het inspireren van zijn leerlingen om te leren zien schuilt zijn grote kracht.
Zijn onderricht begint altijd met het maken van fotogrammen. Hij vindt dat namelijk de basis om begrip te krijgen van een vorm in het vlak en zo te leren omgaan met twee dimensies. Pas na de fotogrammen mogen zijn leerlingen zich wijden aan de afbeelding van drie dimensies in een plat vlak. Afhankelijk van de duur van zijn cursussen, volgen verdere lessen waarin Cor van Weele zijn visie op het vak aan anderen probeert over te dragen. Zo heeft hij honderden leerlingen, ondermeer op de Filmacademie en de Rietveldacademie en een fotograaf als Wouter van Heusden op weg geholpen.
Cor van Weele's oeuvre wordt gekenmerkt door een constante hoge kwaliteit zonder avant-gardistische tendensen. Door deze gelijkmatigheid en door Van Weele's bescheidenheid is zijn fotografie wat op de achtergrond gebleven. Toch kan hij zich meten met de meeste vakmensen van zijn generatie. Velen hebben geprofiteerd van zijn bijdrage aan het onderwijs in de fotografie in Nederland. Zijn grote vakkennis en zijn didactische kwaliteiten zijn altijd voldoende onderkend.