vrijdag 27 juli 2012

Walking in a shuffleboard Achterland Hans van der Meer Photography


Titel: Achterland / [fotogr. en tekst] Hans van der Meer
Auteur: Hans van der Meer (1955-)
Jaar: 2004
Editie: 1e dr
Uitgever: Amsterdam : De Verbeelding
Annotatie: Gedeeltelijk eerder verschenen in: NRC Handelsblad
Omvang: 76 p. : foto's. ; 16Ã-24 cm
ISBN: 90-74159-74-5


Photographer Hans van der Meer made ​​a trip for NRC Handelsblad through the Netherlands. His observations, in words and pictures are often funny, sometimes sad and occasionally poetic. Is this our country? Are we this? The enigmatic Achterland.


Hans van der Meer Hollandse velden 
"Hans van der Meer is a very good Dutch photographer. Dutch Fields is very impressive - it is a combination of sports photography and landscape photography. It shows a sort of small intimacy of amateur football - with humor. It is just a great book, very original!'
- Martin Parr, Magnum Photographer

Hans van der Meer (Leimuiden, 1955) between 1973-76 he studied at MTS voor Fotografie te Den Haag and between 1983-86 he studied photography at Rijksakademie voor Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. Between 1984 and 1986 he photographed streetscenes in Budapest. These pictures were published in the album Quirk of the Fate (Bert Bakker, 1987, 50 photographs, b&w). In 1987 the series won a price in the category Daily Life of World Press Photo. In 1989 Hans van der Meer worked for 3 week in the world-famous balletschool Agrippina Vaganova of St. Petersburg, on the assignment of the Holland Festival. Between 1991 and 1993 he photographed the workers from various factories in Holland. His pictures highlight that in a modern technological society the expression "labour" has lost a lot of its originally physical meaning. In 1993 over 80 b&w photographs of his were published in the album Werk. In 1994 he worked on a series panorama-photographs in b&w of Amsterdam traffic. The pictures were exhibited in 1995 during the Fotofestival Naarden. Later that year they were shown in the Amsterdam Local Archive. In July 2000 De Verbeelding published the series: Amsterdam Traffic, 32 b&w panoramas. On assignment of the Academisch Ziekenhuis Groningen, in 1996 he photographed the city of Groningen. The panoramas in colour formed part of the album Groningen van A tot Z (Paradox, 1997). In September 1995 he started taking photographs of low division amateur-soccer games. He went out looking for football in its original form, as it started more than a hundred years ago: a piece of land, 22 players, no spectators around the pitch, just a horse in the next meadow. The image is far away from the image we know from professional football. The first edition of the album Hollandse Velden (De Verbeelding, 1998, 58 photographs, colour) came out during the World Cup in France, 1998, and the photographs were exhibited during the World Cup, at the Institut Néerlandais in Paris. In December 1998 the Hollandse Velden exhibition was presented in the Nederlands Foto Insituut in Rotterdam. In September 1999 Hans van der Meer was invited by the Centro Portugues de Fotografia to take panorama photographs in Porto. His contemporary images of the city formed part of the exhibition Rondom Porto in the Kunsthal in Rotterdam, March-April 2000. In October 1999 the photographer did a project about bicycles in Beijing, China. His panoramas and his videofilms are presented in June 2000 in Amsterdam and in 2001 in Beijing.












Walking in a shuffleboard Achterland Hans van der Meer Photography


Titel: Achterland / [fotogr. en tekst] Hans van der Meer
Auteur: Hans van der Meer (1955-)
Jaar: 2004
Editie: 1e dr
Uitgever: Amsterdam : De Verbeelding
Annotatie: Gedeeltelijk eerder verschenen in: NRC Handelsblad
Omvang: 76 p. : foto's. ; 16Ã-24 cm
ISBN: 90-74159-74-5


Photographer Hans van der Meer made ​​a trip for NRC Handelsblad through the Netherlands. His observations, in words and pictures are often funny, sometimes sad and occasionally poetic. Is this our country? Are we this? The enigmatic Achterland.


Hans van der Meer Hollandse velden 
"Hans van der Meer is a very good Dutch photographer. Dutch Fields is very impressive - it is a combination of sports photography and landscape photography. It shows a sort of small intimacy of amateur football - with humor. It is just a great book, very original!'
- Martin Parr, Magnum Photographer

Hans van der Meer (Leimuiden, 1955) between 1973-76 he studied at MTS voor Fotografie te Den Haag and between 1983-86 he studied photography at Rijksakademie voor Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam. Between 1984 and 1986 he photographed streetscenes in Budapest. These pictures were published in the album Quirk of the Fate (Bert Bakker, 1987, 50 photographs, b&w). In 1987 the series won a price in the category Daily Life of World Press Photo. In 1989 Hans van der Meer worked for 3 week in the world-famous balletschool Agrippina Vaganova of St. Petersburg, on the assignment of the Holland Festival. Between 1991 and 1993 he photographed the workers from various factories in Holland. His pictures highlight that in a modern technological society the expression "labour" has lost a lot of its originally physical meaning. In 1993 over 80 b&w photographs of his were published in the album Werk. In 1994 he worked on a series panorama-photographs in b&w of Amsterdam traffic. The pictures were exhibited in 1995 during the Fotofestival Naarden. Later that year they were shown in the Amsterdam Local Archive. In July 2000 De Verbeelding published the series: Amsterdam Traffic, 32 b&w panoramas. On assignment of the Academisch Ziekenhuis Groningen, in 1996 he photographed the city of Groningen. The panoramas in colour formed part of the album Groningen van A tot Z (Paradox, 1997). In September 1995 he started taking photographs of low division amateur-soccer games. He went out looking for football in its original form, as it started more than a hundred years ago: a piece of land, 22 players, no spectators around the pitch, just a horse in the next meadow. The image is far away from the image we know from professional football. The first edition of the album Hollandse Velden (De Verbeelding, 1998, 58 photographs, colour) came out during the World Cup in France, 1998, and the photographs were exhibited during the World Cup, at the Institut Néerlandais in Paris. In December 1998 the Hollandse Velden exhibition was presented in the Nederlands Foto Insituut in Rotterdam. In September 1999 Hans van der Meer was invited by the Centro Portugues de Fotografia to take panorama photographs in Porto. His contemporary images of the city formed part of the exhibition Rondom Porto in the Kunsthal in Rotterdam, March-April 2000. In October 1999 the photographer did a project about bicycles in Beijing, China. His panoramas and his videofilms are presented in June 2000 in Amsterdam and in 2001 in Beijing.












donderdag 26 juli 2012

The rise of Prosperity in gray Snapshots Before Color William Eggleston Photography


Before Color


William Eggleston

Nederlands Fotomuseum 16.JUN.2012_26.AUG.2012
The American photographer William Eggleston (1939) is known as one of the first major pioneers of artistic colour photography. His book William Eggleston's Guide was one of the most influential photography books of the 20th century and still inspires many today. Eggleston's black-and-white photographs are less well-known. In Before Color, the Nederlands Fotomuseum highlights this famous photographer's earliest work, which was only recently discovered.

The photographs show that Eggleston found his own style early on. Inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eggleston used a 35mm camera and fast black-and-white film to photograph the American way of life in the early 1960s. We see his own surroundings: suburban Memphis, with its diners, car parks and supermarkets, as well as the houses and domestic interiors of the people who lived there. Before Color by William Eggleston will be on display from 16 June until 26 August.

Breaking a tradition
At the same time Eggleston experimented with colour photography. Together with Joel Meyerowitz, Joel Sternfeld and others, he broke the long tradition of black-and-white photography by working in colour and focusing on subjects from daily life. In 1972 he completed an extensive series of 2,200 photographs entitled Los Alamos, which provided a unique picture of life in America in the '60s and early '70s. He discovered the deep and saturated colours of the so-called dye-transfer printing technique, originally a commercial application that he perfected and that would become his international trademark. His first solo exhibition in 1976 was also the first exhibition in the Museum of Modern Art devoted to colour photography. The exhibition was accompanied by what would become the acclaimed and influential book William Eggleston's Guide.

“As these rediscovered prints reveal, the man who made colour photography into an artform worked brilliantly in monochrome – and his eye for unsettling detail is every bit as sharp” – Sean O’Hagan, The Guardian

Before colour
Eggleston would later abandon black-and-white film altogether and his earliest work was forgotten. So it was a surprise when a box of his black-and-white photographs was recently found in the archives of the William Eggleston Artistic Trust in Memphis. The photographs were exhibited for the first time in 2010 at the Cheim & Read Gallery in New York and published in the book Before Color (Steidl, 2010).


Book Before Color | William Eggleston | Steidl | € 48,- | ISBN 978-3-86930-122-8

See also: www.egglestontrust.com















woensdag 4 juli 2012

Cor Jaring Dit Hap Hap Happens in Amsterdam The Dutch Photobook Graphic Design Photography


JARING, COR Dit Hap Hap Happens in Amsterdam

Amsterdam, Arbeiders Pers, 1966. first edition. Softcover. 24x17. Great Lay-out Happenings & actions by Johnny 'the Selfkicker' van Doorn (= 'Jezus Electronic'), Simon Vinkenoog, Bart Huges (= 'Het derde oog'), Robert Jasper Grootveld (= 'Anti-rook magier'). Subjects like 'Stoned in the street', 'Goed dat er politie is!!!?!' with photos by Cor Jaring.


The Dutch Photobook describes the relatively recent history of the famed Dutch photobook. Editors Rik Suermondt and Frits Gierstberg chose over 120 of the most significant Dutch photobooks and placed them in the context of developments in photography and society.

The post-Second World War Dutch photobook is unique because of the long tradition of graphic designers and photographers working closely together. It is highly prized abroad, and many photobooks have become part of the collections of museums and private collectors. This book shows the immense variety and allure of the Dutch photobook and makes it accessible to a broad audience.
Six chapters, organized both thematically and chronologically, examine company photobooks , photobooks about youth culture, landscape books, city books, travelogues and autonomous photobooks. For each theme, the 20 most noteworthy books are described and represented by gorgeous illustrations of their covers and parts of their contents.
Despite - or perhaps because - the digitization of photography, the traditional medium of the photo book is (still) enormously popular amongst contemporary photographers. They see the book as the ideal form to present their work and to tell their story. The Dutch photo book has built over the years a certain reputation. The close collaboration between graphic designers and photographers determined in the period after 1945 the quality of the Dutch photo books. Gerry Badger wrote: ": ‘One of the most active photobook cultures in the postwar years was Holland, rivalling and perhaps exceeding even France.” 








Cor Jaring Dit Hap Hap Happens in Amsterdam The Dutch Photobook Graphic Design Photography


JARING, COR Dit Hap Hap Happens in Amsterdam

Amsterdam, Arbeiders Pers, 1966. first edition. Softcover. 24x17. Great Lay-out Happenings & actions by Johnny 'the Selfkicker' van Doorn (= 'Jezus Electronic'), Simon Vinkenoog, Bart Huges (= 'Het derde oog'), Robert Jasper Grootveld (= 'Anti-rook magier'). Subjects like 'Stoned in the street', 'Goed dat er politie is!!!?!' with photos by Cor Jaring.


The Dutch Photobook describes the relatively recent history of the famed Dutch photobook. Editors Rik Suermondt and Frits Gierstberg chose over 120 of the most significant Dutch photobooks and placed them in the context of developments in photography and society.

The post-Second World War Dutch photobook is unique because of the long tradition of graphic designers and photographers working closely together. It is highly prized abroad, and many photobooks have become part of the collections of museums and private collectors. This book shows the immense variety and allure of the Dutch photobook and makes it accessible to a broad audience.
Six chapters, organized both thematically and chronologically, examine company photobooks , photobooks about youth culture, landscape books, city books, travelogues and autonomous photobooks. For each theme, the 20 most noteworthy books are described and represented by gorgeous illustrations of their covers and parts of their contents.
Despite - or perhaps because - the digitization of photography, the traditional medium of the photo book is (still) enormously popular amongst contemporary photographers. They see the book as the ideal form to present their work and to tell their story. The Dutch photo book has built over the years a certain reputation. The close collaboration between graphic designers and photographers determined in the period after 1945 the quality of the Dutch photo books. Gerry Badger wrote: ": ‘One of the most active photobook cultures in the postwar years was Holland, rivalling and perhaps exceeding even France.”