maandag 31 oktober 2011

SOL LEWITT’S UNUSUAL COCK FIGHT DANCE Artist's Book Photography


SOL LEWITT’S UNUSUAL COCK FIGHT DANCE

LEWITT, Sol. Cock Fight Dance. (New York): Rizzoli & Multiples, 1980. 12mo, original stiff white paper covers.

First edition of this intriguing photographic sequence of a cock fight-uncharacteristic of LeWitt.

“LeWitt has never forsaken the fundamental approach that he developed in the 1960s, emphasizing ideas over psychological expression… Over the years, however, his work has grown more complex in its effect and more complicated in its execution. The work from the 1960s is the most austere and straightforward, while work from the 1970s inventively compounds the ideas and forms of the prior decade. The early 1980s saw a marked shift involving sensual color and surfaces, and a more explicitly expressive overall character” (San Francisco MoMA). This collection of images of a cock fight fits this latter style, but is nonetheless quite different from his other works of the same period. His current style of using grids is thought to be “as important for drawing as Pollock’s use of the drip technique had been for painting in the 1950s” (Bernice Rose).


The exhibition SOL LEWITT. Artist's Books opening at Art Laboratory Berlin on 21 January presents the complete oeuvre of 75 artists' books produced by the American conceptual artist Sol LeWitt, dating from 1967 to 2002. This exhibition pays tribute to the unique bibliophile production of the artist, who died in 2007.


Upper row : (l) Sol LeWitt, Geometric Figures & Color, New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1979 / (r) Sol LeWitt, Autobiography, New York: Multiples; Boston: Lois and Michael K. Torf 1980// middle row: (l) Sol LeWitt, Photo Grids, New York: Paul David Press; Rizzoli, 1977 / (r) Sol LeWitt,Lines & Color, Zürich: Annemarie Verna 1975 // lower row:(l) Sol LeWitt, Opening Series, Edinburgh: Morning Star Publications, 1994 /(r) Sol LeWitt, Cock Fight Dance, New York: Rizzoli & Multiples, 1980


The American artist Sol LeWitt (1928 - 2007) was an influential figure in minimalism and is considered one of the most important representatives as well as co-founder of American conceptual art. The term "conceptual art" goes directly back to LeWitt: "If the artist carries through his idea and makes it into visible form, then all the steps in the process are of importance. The idea itself, even if not made visual, is as much a work of art as any finished product. All intervening steps - scribbles, sketches, drawings, failed works, models, studies, thoughts, conversations - are of interest. Those that show the thought process of the artist are sometimes more interesting than the final product." (Paragraphs, Artforum, June 1967)


LeWitt's intensive artist books production was extremely versatile: he used different designs and formats as well as varied techniques from color lithography to offset printing. Finally the phenomena of reproducibility was part of the concept: "Also, since art is a vehicle for the transmission of ideas through form, the reproduction of the form only reinforces the concept. It is the idea that is being reproduced." (ibid.)


See also Caldic Collection - Artists’ Books ...



Video © Kira Kaunert, 2010



Sol LeWitt_Conceptual Art_Book Art. Essay by Regine Rapp



SOL LEWITT’S UNUSUAL COCK FIGHT DANCE Artist's Book Photography


SOL LEWITT’S UNUSUAL COCK FIGHT DANCE

LEWITT, Sol. Cock Fight Dance. (New York): Rizzoli & Multiples, 1980. 12mo, original stiff white paper covers.

First edition of this intriguing photographic sequence of a cock fight-uncharacteristic of LeWitt.

“LeWitt has never forsaken the fundamental approach that he developed in the 1960s, emphasizing ideas over psychological expression… Over the years, however, his work has grown more complex in its effect and more complicated in its execution. The work from the 1960s is the most austere and straightforward, while work from the 1970s inventively compounds the ideas and forms of the prior decade. The early 1980s saw a marked shift involving sensual color and surfaces, and a more explicitly expressive overall character” (San Francisco MoMA). This collection of images of a cock fight fits this latter style, but is nonetheless quite different from his other works of the same period. His current style of using grids is thought to be “as important for drawing as Pollock’s use of the drip technique had been for painting in the 1950s” (Bernice Rose).


The exhibition SOL LEWITT. Artist's Books opening at Art Laboratory Berlin on 21 January presents the complete oeuvre of 75 artists' books produced by the American conceptual artist Sol LeWitt, dating from 1967 to 2002. This exhibition pays tribute to the unique bibliophile production of the artist, who died in 2007.


Upper row : (l) Sol LeWitt, Geometric Figures & Color, New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1979 / (r) Sol LeWitt, Autobiography, New York: Multiples; Boston: Lois and Michael K. Torf 1980// middle row: (l) Sol LeWitt, Photo Grids, New York: Paul David Press; Rizzoli, 1977 / (r) Sol LeWitt,Lines & Color, Zürich: Annemarie Verna 1975 // lower row:(l) Sol LeWitt, Opening Series, Edinburgh: Morning Star Publications, 1994 /(r) Sol LeWitt, Cock Fight Dance, New York: Rizzoli & Multiples, 1980


The American artist Sol LeWitt (1928 - 2007) was an influential figure in minimalism and is considered one of the most important representatives as well as co-founder of American conceptual art. The term "conceptual art" goes directly back to LeWitt: "If the artist carries through his idea and makes it into visible form, then all the steps in the process are of importance. The idea itself, even if not made visual, is as much a work of art as any finished product. All intervening steps - scribbles, sketches, drawings, failed works, models, studies, thoughts, conversations - are of interest. Those that show the thought process of the artist are sometimes more interesting than the final product." (Paragraphs, Artforum, June 1967)


LeWitt's intensive artist books production was extremely versatile: he used different designs and formats as well as varied techniques from color lithography to offset printing. Finally the phenomena of reproducibility was part of the concept: "Also, since art is a vehicle for the transmission of ideas through form, the reproduction of the form only reinforces the concept. It is the idea that is being reproduced." (ibid.)


See also Caldic Collection - Artists’ Books ...



Video © Kira Kaunert, 2010



Sol LeWitt_Conceptual Art_Book Art. Essay by Regine Rapp



zondag 30 oktober 2011

the Snapshots of George Hendrik Breitner Online Photography


2300 photographs by Breitner online from November

The RKD is publishing the first digital overview in English of photographs by the Amsterdam Impressionist painter George Hendrik Breitner (1857-1923). A total of 2,300 original photos from the RKD collection will be accessible to an international audience from November 2011.

George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in kimono (Geesje Kwak), 1893, RKD Photographic Collection
Until now Breitner’s photos have primarily been presented as studies for his paintings. However, the photographs are also fine and important works of art in their own right and they offer a unique picture of city life around 1900.

George Hendrik Breitner, View of the Singel in Amsterdam, 1889 – 1915, RKD Photographic Collection
Breitner’s original prints and negatives were donated to the RKD in 1961, exactly 50 years ago. Before then it was not known that Breitner, besides being a painter, was also an important photographer. Individual photos have regularly been included in exhibitions and publications. In 2011 high-resolution scans were produced of all the photographs so that the originals can be safely stored in optimal conditions.
A new online publication will make all 2,300 photographs available to the public for the first time. An introductory text by photographic historian Hans Rooseboom, curator of the Rijksmuseum, discusses the importance of Breitner’s photographic oeuvre. In order to acquaint a wide, international audience with Breitner the photographer, the publication will appear in English as well as Dutch. George Hendrik Breitner. Fotograaf /George Hendrik Breitner. Photographer will be published on the RKD website in November 2011.

G.H. Breitner, Two women in the snow, c.1889 – 1915, RKD Photographic Collection
Coinciding with the online publication of Breitner’s photographs, the Van Gogh Museum (Amsterdam) will host the exhibition Snapshot. Painters and Photography, 1888-1915 (from 14 October), in which Breitner’s work is for the first time presented in the context of other nineteenth-century painters ( Pierre Bonnard, Maurice Denis, Henri Evenepoel, Henri Rivière, Felix Valloton en Edouard Vuillard ) who liked to use the camera. Thereafter the exhibition will be on view in the US, at the Phillips Collection (Washington D.C.) and the Indianapolis Museum of Art. In collaboration with the Rijksmuseum the Institut Néerlandais (Paris) is also dedicating an exhibition to Breitner’s photographic work, George Hendrik Breitner – Pioneer of street photography, opening in November.
Click this link for a preview:
De fotocamera gaf schilders een fotografisch oog

Sandra Smallenburg
Recensie Recensie | Zaterdag 29-10-2011 | Sectie: Overig | Pagina: 10 | Sandra Smallenburg

Veel schilders maakten eind negentiende eeuw gretig maar ook beschaamd gebruik van de eerste fototoestellen. Het Van Gogh Museum toont hun snapshots van het alledaagse.

De allereerste pocketcamera van Kodak was een doosje van nog geen tien bij twintig centimeter, gemaakt van kersenhout en bekleed met donkerbruin Marokkaans leer. Een fototoestel zonder zoeker en met slechts één sluitertijd van 1/25 seconde. In het doosje was ruimte voor een film met honderd opnames. Waren die vol, dan stuurde je de camera in zijn geheel naar de Kodak-fabriek om de rol te laten ontwikkelen. U drukt op de knop, wij doen de rest, zo luidde de slogan waarmee George Eastman zijn nieuwe uitvinding vanaf 1888 aan de man bracht.
Op de tentoonstelling Snapshot in het Van Gogh Museum, over de relatie tussen fotografie en schilderkunst in de periode 1888-1915, staan een paar van die oude cameraatjes opgesteld in vitrines. Ze maakten het aan het eind van de negentiende eeuw voor het eerst mogelijk dat amateurs, zonder kennis van chemicaliën, konden gaan fotograferen. Ook in de kunstwereld zorgde de komst van de compacte Kodak No.1 voor een kleine revolutie. Veel schilders gingen er enthousiast mee aan de slag. Aan zeven van hen is deze formidabele expositie gewijd.

Het eerste wat opvalt in het Van Gogh is hoe weinig er in de afgelopen eeuw veranderd is op het gebied van de amateurfotografie. Natuurlijk, de foto's van schilders als Pierre Bonnard of Maurice Denis zijn zwart-wit en vaak onscherp, maar hun onderwerpen zijn dezelfde als die wij tegenwoordig op onze Facebook-pagina's plaatsen. Kiekjes van huiselijk geluk, van pasgeboren baby's en dromerig kijkende geliefdes, van stedentripjes en van vakanties aan zee. Hun sepiakleurige beelden van het alledaagse leven ogen net zo fris en spontaan als onze iPhone-hipstamatics, met veel afgesneden hoofden en overbelichte gezichten.

Een groot verschil met nu is dat de schilders van toen er niet graag voor uit kwamen dat ze ook fotogra feerden. Geen van de foto's die nu in het Van Gogh te zien zijn, is ooit tijdens hun leven geëxposeerd. De drieduizend foto's die George Hendrik Breitner maakte bijvoorbeeld werden pas in 1961 ontdekt, bijna veertig jaar na zijn dood. Fotografie was een mechanische uitvinding, zo werd lang gedacht, geen artistieke.

Wat deze tentoonstelling en de voortreffelijke catalogus goed duidelijk maken, is dat ondanks die aanvankelijke schroom de Kodak No.1 wel degelijk van grote invloed is geweest op de schilderkunst rond 1900. Foto's konden als voorstudie dienen en werden soms heel letterlijk nageschilderd, zoals te zien is aan de intieme portretten die Félix Vallotton maakte van zijn vrouw Gabrielle. En Maurice Denis was waarschijnlijk nooit op het idee gekomen om zijn echtgenote Marthe en hun pasgeboren dochter zo in close-up te schilderen (Noële et sa mère, 1896) als hij niet ook talloze portretfoto's van hen had gemaakt.

Door de fotografie deed het toeval zijn intrede in de schilderkunst. Neem Breitners beroemde schilderij uit het Rijksmuseum, De Singelbrug bij de Paleisstraat te Amsterdam uit 1897. Dat werk ziet er zo dynamisch en losjes uit dat het net een uitvergrote foto lijkt - een echte toevalstreffer. De vrouw met de bontjas die onderin het schilderij alweer bijna het beeld uitloopt, de horizon die een beetje scheef loopt, de gevels van de grachtenpanden die aan de bovenzijde zijn afgesneden - het zijn allemaal voorbeelden van de fotografische blik die Breitner ontwikkeld had.
Een grote ontdekking op deze tentoonstelling is Henri Evenepoel, een Vlaamse kunstenaar die slechts zeven jaar werkzaam was en in 1899 op 27-jarige leeftijd overleed. Twee jaar voor zijn dood was hij fanatiek met een draagbare Kodak-camera aan de slag gegaan, en de 875 negatieven die hij naliet maken duidelijk dat hij misschien wel meer talent had als fotograaf dan als schilder. De kinderportretten die hij schilderde ogen nog vrij statisch en formeel. Maar met zijn camera in de hand was hij veel vrijer. Dan koos hij voor afwijkende standpunten, zakte door zijn knieën om op ooghoogte met de kinderen te komen, liet ze naar hem toe rennen of trachtte de beweging van hun balspel vast te leggen.
Een van die foto's, van zijn zieke zoontje Charles, laat je niet snel los. Evenepoel positioneerde zijn camera haast tegen de spijlen van het bed aan, waardoor het net is of het kind - ogen geloken, duim in de mond - achter tralies zit. Het is een zeldzaam ontroerend moment, vastgelegd met een rudimentair doosje van tien bij twintig centimeter. Maar 112 jaar en vele digitale ontwikkelingen later raakt het ons nog net zo diep als toen.
Schilders als Breitner, Bonnard schaamden zich voor hun fotografie Foto's Breitner worden online toegankelijk Vijftig jaar geleden, in 1961, kwam aan het licht dat George Hendrik Breitner behalve schilder ook een verdienstelijk fotograaf was. Zo'n 3.000 van zijn foto's en negatieven zijn bewaard gebleven, 2.300 daarvan bevinden zich in de collectie van het RKD in Den Haag. Die foto's zijn dit jaar allemaal in hoge kwaliteit gedigitaliseerd en zullen vanaf 3 november online toegankelijk zijn. Op rkd.nl licht fotohistoricus Hans Rooseboom, conservator bij het Rijksmuseum, het belang van Breitners foto's toe in een internetpublicatie. Van 3 nov t/m 22 jan organsieert het Rijksmuseum bovendien een expositie met foto's van Breitner in het Institut Néerlandais in Parijs. De tentoonstelling Snapshot in het Van Gogh Museum zal in 2012 doorreizen naar de Philips Collection in Washington en het Indianapolis Museum of Art en daarmee de foto's van Breitner bij het Amerikaanse publiek introduceren.
Info: 'Snapshot, schilders en fotografie 1888-1915'. T/m 8 jan in het Van Gogh Museum, Paulus Potterstraat 7, Amsterdam. Catalogus 35 euro. Inl: www.vangoghmuseum.nl. ****
Foto-onderschrift: George Hendrik Breitner: 'De Singelbrug bij de Paleisstraat te Amsterdam' (ca. 1897) Pierre Bonnard: 'Marthe in profiel gezeten op het bed met hangend linkerbeen' (1899/1900) George Hendrik Breitner: 'Leunend naakt' (geen datum)
Op dit artikel rust auteursrecht van NRC Handelsblad BV, respectievelijk van de oorspronkelijke auteur.













the Snapshots of George Hendrik Breitner Online Photography


2300 photographs by Breitner online from November

The RKD is publishing the first digital overview in English of photographs by the Amsterdam Impressionist painter George Hendrik Breitner (1857-1923). A total of 2,300 original photos from the RKD collection will be accessible to an international audience from November 2011.

George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in kimono (Geesje Kwak), 1893, RKD Photographic Collection
Until now Breitner’s photos have primarily been presented as studies for his paintings. However, the photographs are also fine and important works of art in their own right and they offer a unique picture of city life around 1900.

George Hendrik Breitner, View of the Singel in Amsterdam, 1889 – 1915, RKD Photographic Collection
Breitner’s original prints and negatives were donated to the RKD in 1961, exactly 50 years ago. Before then it was not known that Breitner, besides being a painter, was also an important photographer. Individual photos have regularly been included in exhibitions and publications. In 2011 high-resolution scans were produced of all the photographs so that the originals can be safely stored in optimal conditions.
A new online publication will make all 2,300 photographs available to the public for the first time. An introductory text by photographic historian Hans Rooseboom, curator of the Rijksmuseum, discusses the importance of Breitner’s photographic oeuvre. In order to acquaint a wide, international audience with Breitner the photographer, the publication will appear in English as well as Dutch. George Hendrik Breitner. Fotograaf /George Hendrik Breitner. Photographer will be published on the RKD website in November 2011.

G.H. Breitner, Two women in the snow, c.1889 – 1915, RKD Photographic Collection
Coinciding with the online publication of Breitner’s photographs, the Van Gogh Museum (Amsterdam) will host the exhibition Snapshot. Painters and Photography, 1888-1915 (from 14 October), in which Breitner’s work is for the first time presented in the context of other nineteenth-century painters ( Pierre Bonnard, Maurice Denis, Henri Evenepoel, Henri Rivière, Felix Valloton en Edouard Vuillard ) who liked to use the camera. Thereafter the exhibition will be on view in the US, at the Phillips Collection (Washington D.C.) and the Indianapolis Museum of Art. In collaboration with the Rijksmuseum the Institut Néerlandais (Paris) is also dedicating an exhibition to Breitner’s photographic work, George Hendrik Breitner – Pioneer of street photography, opening in November.
Click this link for a preview:
De fotocamera gaf schilders een fotografisch oog

Sandra Smallenburg
Recensie Recensie | Zaterdag 29-10-2011 | Sectie: Overig | Pagina: 10 | Sandra Smallenburg

Veel schilders maakten eind negentiende eeuw gretig maar ook beschaamd gebruik van de eerste fototoestellen. Het Van Gogh Museum toont hun snapshots van het alledaagse.

De allereerste pocketcamera van Kodak was een doosje van nog geen tien bij twintig centimeter, gemaakt van kersenhout en bekleed met donkerbruin Marokkaans leer. Een fototoestel zonder zoeker en met slechts één sluitertijd van 1/25 seconde. In het doosje was ruimte voor een film met honderd opnames. Waren die vol, dan stuurde je de camera in zijn geheel naar de Kodak-fabriek om de rol te laten ontwikkelen. U drukt op de knop, wij doen de rest, zo luidde de slogan waarmee George Eastman zijn nieuwe uitvinding vanaf 1888 aan de man bracht.
Op de tentoonstelling Snapshot in het Van Gogh Museum, over de relatie tussen fotografie en schilderkunst in de periode 1888-1915, staan een paar van die oude cameraatjes opgesteld in vitrines. Ze maakten het aan het eind van de negentiende eeuw voor het eerst mogelijk dat amateurs, zonder kennis van chemicaliën, konden gaan fotograferen. Ook in de kunstwereld zorgde de komst van de compacte Kodak No.1 voor een kleine revolutie. Veel schilders gingen er enthousiast mee aan de slag. Aan zeven van hen is deze formidabele expositie gewijd.

Het eerste wat opvalt in het Van Gogh is hoe weinig er in de afgelopen eeuw veranderd is op het gebied van de amateurfotografie. Natuurlijk, de foto's van schilders als Pierre Bonnard of Maurice Denis zijn zwart-wit en vaak onscherp, maar hun onderwerpen zijn dezelfde als die wij tegenwoordig op onze Facebook-pagina's plaatsen. Kiekjes van huiselijk geluk, van pasgeboren baby's en dromerig kijkende geliefdes, van stedentripjes en van vakanties aan zee. Hun sepiakleurige beelden van het alledaagse leven ogen net zo fris en spontaan als onze iPhone-hipstamatics, met veel afgesneden hoofden en overbelichte gezichten.

Een groot verschil met nu is dat de schilders van toen er niet graag voor uit kwamen dat ze ook fotogra feerden. Geen van de foto's die nu in het Van Gogh te zien zijn, is ooit tijdens hun leven geëxposeerd. De drieduizend foto's die George Hendrik Breitner maakte bijvoorbeeld werden pas in 1961 ontdekt, bijna veertig jaar na zijn dood. Fotografie was een mechanische uitvinding, zo werd lang gedacht, geen artistieke.

Wat deze tentoonstelling en de voortreffelijke catalogus goed duidelijk maken, is dat ondanks die aanvankelijke schroom de Kodak No.1 wel degelijk van grote invloed is geweest op de schilderkunst rond 1900. Foto's konden als voorstudie dienen en werden soms heel letterlijk nageschilderd, zoals te zien is aan de intieme portretten die Félix Vallotton maakte van zijn vrouw Gabrielle. En Maurice Denis was waarschijnlijk nooit op het idee gekomen om zijn echtgenote Marthe en hun pasgeboren dochter zo in close-up te schilderen (Noële et sa mère, 1896) als hij niet ook talloze portretfoto's van hen had gemaakt.

Door de fotografie deed het toeval zijn intrede in de schilderkunst. Neem Breitners beroemde schilderij uit het Rijksmuseum, De Singelbrug bij de Paleisstraat te Amsterdam uit 1897. Dat werk ziet er zo dynamisch en losjes uit dat het net een uitvergrote foto lijkt - een echte toevalstreffer. De vrouw met de bontjas die onderin het schilderij alweer bijna het beeld uitloopt, de horizon die een beetje scheef loopt, de gevels van de grachtenpanden die aan de bovenzijde zijn afgesneden - het zijn allemaal voorbeelden van de fotografische blik die Breitner ontwikkeld had.
Een grote ontdekking op deze tentoonstelling is Henri Evenepoel, een Vlaamse kunstenaar die slechts zeven jaar werkzaam was en in 1899 op 27-jarige leeftijd overleed. Twee jaar voor zijn dood was hij fanatiek met een draagbare Kodak-camera aan de slag gegaan, en de 875 negatieven die hij naliet maken duidelijk dat hij misschien wel meer talent had als fotograaf dan als schilder. De kinderportretten die hij schilderde ogen nog vrij statisch en formeel. Maar met zijn camera in de hand was hij veel vrijer. Dan koos hij voor afwijkende standpunten, zakte door zijn knieën om op ooghoogte met de kinderen te komen, liet ze naar hem toe rennen of trachtte de beweging van hun balspel vast te leggen.
Een van die foto's, van zijn zieke zoontje Charles, laat je niet snel los. Evenepoel positioneerde zijn camera haast tegen de spijlen van het bed aan, waardoor het net is of het kind - ogen geloken, duim in de mond - achter tralies zit. Het is een zeldzaam ontroerend moment, vastgelegd met een rudimentair doosje van tien bij twintig centimeter. Maar 112 jaar en vele digitale ontwikkelingen later raakt het ons nog net zo diep als toen.
Schilders als Breitner, Bonnard schaamden zich voor hun fotografie Foto's Breitner worden online toegankelijk Vijftig jaar geleden, in 1961, kwam aan het licht dat George Hendrik Breitner behalve schilder ook een verdienstelijk fotograaf was. Zo'n 3.000 van zijn foto's en negatieven zijn bewaard gebleven, 2.300 daarvan bevinden zich in de collectie van het RKD in Den Haag. Die foto's zijn dit jaar allemaal in hoge kwaliteit gedigitaliseerd en zullen vanaf 3 november online toegankelijk zijn. Op rkd.nl licht fotohistoricus Hans Rooseboom, conservator bij het Rijksmuseum, het belang van Breitners foto's toe in een internetpublicatie. Van 3 nov t/m 22 jan organsieert het Rijksmuseum bovendien een expositie met foto's van Breitner in het Institut Néerlandais in Parijs. De tentoonstelling Snapshot in het Van Gogh Museum zal in 2012 doorreizen naar de Philips Collection in Washington en het Indianapolis Museum of Art en daarmee de foto's van Breitner bij het Amerikaanse publiek introduceren.
Info: 'Snapshot, schilders en fotografie 1888-1915'. T/m 8 jan in het Van Gogh Museum, Paulus Potterstraat 7, Amsterdam. Catalogus 35 euro. Inl: www.vangoghmuseum.nl. ****
Foto-onderschrift: George Hendrik Breitner: 'De Singelbrug bij de Paleisstraat te Amsterdam' (ca. 1897) Pierre Bonnard: 'Marthe in profiel gezeten op het bed met hangend linkerbeen' (1899/1900) George Hendrik Breitner: 'Leunend naakt' (geen datum)
Op dit artikel rust auteursrecht van NRC Handelsblad BV, respectievelijk van de oorspronkelijke auteur.













zaterdag 29 oktober 2011

Sebastião Salgado Malpensa, La città del volo Gerry Badger's Choice of Company Photobooks Photography


Sebastião Salgado Malpensa, La città del volo, SEA Aeroporti di Milano, Italy, 2000.


Sebastião Salgado was born on February 8th, 1944 in Aimorés, in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. He lives in Paris. Having studied economics, Salgado began his career as a professional photographer in 1973 in Paris, working with the photo agencies Sygma, Gamma, and Magnum Photos until 1994, when he and Lélia Wanick Salgado formed Amazonas images, an agency created exclusively for his work.


He has travelled in over 100 countries for his photographic projects. Most of these, besides appearing in numerous press publications, have also been presented in books such as Other Americas (1986),Sahel: l’homme en détresse (1986), Sahel: el fin del camino (1988), Workers (1993), Terra (1997), Migrations and Portraits (2000), and Africa (2007). Touring exhibitions of this work have been, and continue to be, presented throughout the world.


Sebastião Salgado has been awarded numerous major photographic prizes in recognition of his accomplishments. He is a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, and an honorary member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences in the United States. 


Gerry Badger is a photographer, architect, and photographic critic. He has written extensively for the photographic press, and has curated a number of exhibitions, including 'The Photographer as Printmaker' (1980) for the Arts Council of Great Britain, and 'Through the Looking Glass: Post-war British Photography' (1989) for the Barbican Arts Centre, London.

His own work is in a number of public and private collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Victoria and Albert Museum, The Arts Council Collection, and The Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris.

He has written introductory essays to many photographic monographs, including those of such photographers as Stephen Shore, John Gossage, Martin Parr and Chris Killip. Among his books are 'Collecting Photography' (2002), 'The Genius of Photography' (2007), and (with Martin Parr), 'The Photobook: A History' (2 vols.,)