zaterdag 30 april 2011

Groningen A-Z Hans Aarsman Hans van der Meer Mirelle Thijsen's Choice of Photobooks on Care environments and Matters of Life and Death Photography


Groningen A-Z. Groningen in foto's. Edited by Bas Vroege, Deanna Herst, Henrik Barends. Edam : Paradox, 1997. In-4° (29 x 29 cm). Broché. Photography :

Aarsman, Hans (NL, 1951) ;  Barelds, Bert (NL) ;  Berger, Wout (NL, 1941) ;  Blonk, Arthur (NL, 1945) ;  Boekhout, Henze (NL, 1947) ;  Boesveld, Michel (NL, 1957) ;  Boonstra, Rommert (NL, 1942) ;  Bosboom, Jur (NL, 1946) ;  Brake, Wim te (NL) act. c.1995 ;  Brasser, Fons (NL, 1944) ;  Broekhuis, Ton (NL, 1951) ;  Cock, Harry (NL, 1952) ;  Conens, Herman (NL) ;  Derwig, Jan (NL) act. c.1995 ;  Janssen, Bert (NL, 1957) ;  Kooi, Ellen (NL, 1962) ;  Kramer, Luuk (NL, 1958) ;  Lamsweerde, Inez van (NL, 1963) ;  Lange, Tineke de (NL) ;  Meer, Hans van der (NL, 1955) ;  Mulder, John (NL, 1963) ;  Nypels, Rob (NL, 1951) ; Pool, Freerk (NL) act. c.1995 ;  Pool, Geeske (NL) act. c.1995 ;  Pool, Thomas (NL) act. c.1995 ;  Sas, Hans (NL, 1941) ; Sengers, Harry (NL, 1948) ;  Stoel, John (NL) ;  Swart, Siebe (NL, 1957) ;  Vandermeer, Pieter (NL, 1940) ;  Visscher, Sjors (NL) act. c.1995 ;  Volmer, Marcel (NL) act. c.1995 ;  Vries, Janke de (NL, 1949) ;  Zwarts, Kim (NL, 1955).



This guide focuses on the meaning and significance of photobooks concerning health care environments. Heart-rending, intimate stories on matters of life, sickness, death and personal loss, are observed and experienced by consecutive generations of photographers working in the documentary tradition.











vrijdag 29 april 2011

Bijou-angel Linda-Maria Birbeck Mirelle Thijsen's Choice of Photobooks on Care environments and Matters of Life and Death Photography



Bijou-angel. Design by Bram Nijssen
Autres Directions. 2005. Oblong. Ills. Paperback.

Photobooks on care environ ments and matters of life and death in post-war Holland: THEN and NOW


This guide focuses on the meaning and significance of photobooks concerning health care environments. Heart-rending, intimate stories on matters of life, sickness, death and personal loss, are observed and experienced by consecutive generations of photographers working in the documentary tradition. Martien Coppens (1908-1986), Koos Breukel (1962), Carel van Hees (1954), Rince de Jong (1970), Roy Villevoye (1960), and Albert van Westing (1960) unveil various aspects of the everyday lives of their friends and family, as well as people in their professional environment who suffer from a severe illness or find themselves facing grim adversity. The photographers record how these people, some of whom are very dear to them, try to deal with their illness or misfortune with a need to hold on to memories of a happier past, and to understand their slow deterioration and the bewilderment that comes with it. There is often a great sense of urgency: the clock is ticking.

The world of the loved one, the patient, is turned upside down. Suddenly, life is built around medical care and attempts to find a new sense of meaning and purpose. A new dimension is added to the concept of ‘home’: ‘home’ is no longer a safe and protected place, and consequently the patient no longer experiences it as such. ‘Home’ turns into a health care environment. Simultaneously, a different kind of reality suddenly becomes of vital importance close to home: the care facility. That turns into a new ‘home’ of sorts, in the shape of a transitory location of controlled care and attention. The hospital, the nursing home, the mental institution; they are like hotels – a temporary accommodation, often born out of necessity, sometimes unwanted; a place to meet fellow sufferers. The photographer infringes upon that environment; he/she considers the ‘home away from home’ his/her work environment.

The core of the exhibition is shaped by photobooks published by and on the Dutch public health care. In addition, photobooks on consumer driven health care and loss within one’s domestic circle and circle of friends are put on view, self-published by modern day photographers. Those publications are considered to be an extension of the genre. Within the genre, photobooks since post-war reconstruction constitute a category of their own.

After World War II photographers recorded their fascination of the harsh reality of human suffering in a number of photobooks. Each of the 25 photobooks selected for this exhibition represents a photographer’s strategy regarding the documentation of medical and personal care in public and private space, then and now. Not only do they show the progression of personal tragedy; they also display the development of care environments in The Netherlands, and the birth of a genre in documentary photography. In this exhibition you will find visual narratives on academic hospitals by the first generation of photographers to work in a tradition of humanist photography and who were members of the Dutch photographer’s guild (GKf). Among them are Eva Besnyö (1910-2003) and Ad Windig (1912-1996). Photobooks that were published after the Second World War are composed around the verb ‘to live’. Moralistic and patronizing in tone they speak of nursing and nurturing in a confined workplace; mental bewilderment and daily care; a ‘day in the life’ of a patient in a care environment that tries to mimic a home life. These publications subsequently make way for self-published and digitally produced book projects. The personal involvement reflected in those projects is domestic and local in nature, focused on the photographer’s own environment and family. Books on display by contemporary author-photographers like Linda-Maria Birbeck (1974), Annelies Goedhart (1979) and Jaap Scheeren (1979) reveal that approach.

Photobooks are selected that were groundbreaking in their day and in the way they depict the socially, often highly sensitive, themes of health care in text and images. Further, the books stand out for their technical execution, layout and way of photographic storytelling. In sum, this exhibition is about commissioners, photographers, graphic designers and graphic industry that have played an important role in the history of photography and graphic design.














woensdag 27 april 2011

Richard Prince Jokes and Cartoons Ringier Annual Report 2005 Photography

Richard Prince: Jokes and Cartoons

Edited by Beatrix Ruf.

In conveying the seriousness with which he sees and uses his lighthearted material, Richard Prince has said, "Jokes and cartoons are part of any mainstream magazine. Especially magazines like The New Yorker or Playboy. They're right up there with the editorial and advertisements and table of contents and letters to the editors. They're part of the layout, part of the Îsights' and Îgags.' Sometimes they're political, sometimes they just make fun of everyday life. Once in a while they drive people to protest and storm foreign embassies and kill people. Prince has always recycled found materials from American popular culture, most often images from advertisements and magazine photography. He re-photographs, silkscreens, overpaints, frames, enlarges or composes collages, playing with the material's somehow empty meaning. Citation, deflection, appropriation: every treatment is explored and played with. Among these works, as among the pages of the magazines, jokes and cartoons occupy an important place. This book, conceived by the artist, assembles for the first time the raw material of the creation of his "Joke Paintings"--not just the well-known works, but never-before-seen examples from his personal collection, his unpublished manuscripts and the original cartoons and jokes themselves.

Ringier is a multinational integrated media company. Founded in 1833, Ringier is carrying print, broadcast, radio, online and mobile media brands, and is a successful player in the printing, entertainment and internet business. Ringier is a Swiss family-company with headquarters in Zurich.








dinsdag 26 april 2011

The Photo-book as Artist’s Book Ringier Annual Report 2002 Aleksandra Mir Design Photography

HELLO Ringier 
Ringier Annual Report 2002, Zurich 2003. 


My name is Aleksandra Mir, I am an artist, and I have been asked to make your annual report this year. Here it is. The artwork on these pages is based on an ongoing research project of mine entitled ‘HELLO’ that I have already produced and exhibited on seven occasions and in as many cities around the world. In principle, ‘HELLO’ is a visual daisy chain, connecting people throughout the world and the history of photography. Each person appears twice, in two different photos, with two different people, so that each added image is an answer to the preceding one, and poses a question to the next. It is a simple idea, but given all the variables the project grows immensely complex and easily becomes a lifetime commitment, theoretically encompassing the whole photographed population of the earth.

‘HELLO’ is always produced with the help of local resources and assistance, the composition of which varies greatly, but which always imprints itself and becomes an inevitable part of the resulting work. During my two-month residency here at the Ringier offices in Zurich, I was offered a chance to explore the structure of the corporation, to meet and interact with the people who work here and to dive into the gold mine of the photographic archives. I also made day trips around Switzerland to investigate further leads on the natural course of people’s lives, or to link with external resources. It has been very interesting.

The in-house photographic archive of some 10 million images (nobody really knows how many there are in the basement) is a strange, beautiful and deeply unpredictable land, in constant negotiation with itself and the external world. On a pragmatic level, it is simply the collection of past news stories, quietly filed away, in most cases never to be discovered again. But when things are pulled from the past to briefly comment on the present, something truly magical occurs. Traces of past technology, such as pre-Photoshop editorial markings in red crayon on b/w photos, meet the glaring color saturation of a fully digitally produced image. Between the two, a baby has grown into an adult woman with a child of her own.

One of the greatest pleasures in the course of creating this work was, for example, to first find a fantastic early ’70s photograph of the pop star Toni Vescoli holding his newborn baby daughter Natalie on his guitar. Then two days later, to be sitting on a train on my way to a small town I had never heard of before, and to be picked up at the station by Natalie herself; to meet her family in turn and to browse through her own, more recent albums at the kitchen table. After a mutual brainstorming session to decide where the lead could go next, a call is placed to her neighbor, writer Nicolas Lindt, connected via their children, who play together, which leads directly to a photo of him with The Edge from U2. This picture was taken during an interview for Schweizer Illustrierte at U2’s world tour concert in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 1986. And Gothenburg happens to be the town where I grew up. Later, back in the archive, I found myself in a crowd photo from that very concert. It was crazy.


Another route could be followed by starting off at the local library in St. Moritz, with photos of Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks posing together with their local ski instructor. Then, following these celebrities, who visit Switzerland again and again over time, eventually relating them to a news story produced in-house by the Ringier journalist and photographer Joseph Ritler, whom I later connect with on the phone and who sends me more of his personal pictures. With all of this, I have relied heavily on the guidance, translation, anecdotes and personal interest of many of Ringier’s employees, who have considerably shaped the outcome of the work, as have all other public, private and external contributors whom I thank deeply at the back of this publication.

Spending time on location in Switzerland seems to call for the development of a national theme. But if anything, this project proves the impossibility of stating the coherence of any community at all; instead it follows the irregular and sprawling flow of people’s dispersed relations through time and place. Hollywood, of course, will always be a shared nucleus for everyone on this earth. But, perhaps as a joke on the improbability of coherence, a strange local theme has occurred quite spontaneously in the course of making this version of ‘HELLO’: winter sports, in fact and fiction, with celebrities and regular people enjoying the best of what Switzerland has to offer. So have I. Thank you.

Aleksandra Mir, Zurich, March 2003.

Ringier is a multinational integrated media company. Founded in 1833, Ringier is carrying print, broadcast, radio, online and mobile media brands, and is a successful player in the printing, entertainment and internet business. Ringier is a Swiss family-company with headquarters in Zurich.












maandag 25 april 2011

RINGIER ANNUAL REPORT 2006 ART AND VISUAL CONCEPT BY RICHARD PHILLIPS


(PHILLIPS, RICHARD). RUF, BEATRIX, FRANK A. MEYER & RICHARD PHILLIPS -RINGIER ANNUAL REPORT 2006: ART AND VISUAL CONCEPT BY RICHARD PHILLIPS

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Zurich, SWITZERLAND, Ringier AG Corporate Communications., 2007, First Edition. Gilt Debossed Boards, Small 4to, xx + 40pp, profusely illustrated in color and duotone. Text in English. Published as Swiss media conglomerate Ringier's 2006 annual report, this beautiful hardbound tome is an artist's book designed by Richard Phillips after a 1930s German monograph on the Medieval sculptor Tilman Riemenschneider. It features reproductions of eleven works on paper by the artist executed during 2006 (including a delightful appropriated drawing of Tom Cruise!) along with a discussion of the project with noted curator Beatrix Ruf.

Ringier is a multinational integrated media company. Founded in 1833, Ringier is carrying print, broadcast, radio, online and mobile media brands, and is a successful player in the printing, entertainment and internet business. Ringier is a Swiss family-company with headquarters in Zurich.


Richard Phillips, designer of the 2006 Ringier annual report

The tenth artist to design a Ringier annual report.

Zurich, 22 March 2007

Richard Phillips, who lives and works in New York, was born in 1962 in Marblehead, Mass.

His choice of Fraktur as the report’s principal typeface can be traced back to an inspiration he drew from a book, published in the 1930s, about sculptor and woodcarver Tilman Riemenschneider. Says Phillips: “After studying the ways in which the previous artists worked with the report I felt that by accepting the commission I would have an opportunity to change the way art, within the context of media, represents and functions as no more than entertainment and décor (...) My aim is to use art to contest the validity, sanctity and acceptance of images as conveyors of meaning stripped of consequence – propaganda, in other words.”

Ringier collection curator and director of Kunsthalle Zurich, Beatrix Ruf writes: “In his works in general and for this report in particular, Richard Phillips makes use of the iconic quality of pictures which the media and art use daily – each according to its own agenda. In his paintings and his works executed on paper, the artist potentiates an ambivalence inherent in these pictures, in which he takes their tempting beauty and ambiguity to the breaking point. He translates pictures he found, which deal with the marketability of man, his wishes, ideas, actions, identity, sexuality, politics, power and death, into drawings and then, masterful paintings, executed in an elaborate process.”

The pictures Phillips selected for the Ringier annual report are the drafts of eleven large-size paintings which he will present to the public for the first time in April 2007, in Los Angeles.

See for a review of the Ringier Annual Reports ...