dinsdag 21 september 2010

Dutch Artists of the 125 YouTube Videos Shortlisted for Guggenheim's YouTube Play

  

YouTube Play. A Biennial of Creative Video Kiosk, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY. Photo: Kristopher McKay © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, 2010.

By: Jake Coyle, AP Entertainment Writer
NEW YORK (AP).- Among the hundreds of thousands of videos uploaded daily to YouTube, surely a work of art is in there somewhere.

Such is the premise behind "YouTube Play: A Biennial of Creative Video," the first curated search for videos of a higher brow on the popular Google Inc.-owned website. From among more than 23,000 submissions from 91 countries, 125 videos were shortlisted for the inaugural biennial.

A curatorial team from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York selected the videos, which will play at kiosks in Guggenheim museums in New York; Berlin; Bilbao, Spain, and Venice, Italy, beginning Monday.

A jury that includes filmmaker Darren Aronofsky and visual artist Takashi Murakami will whittle the results down further to about 20 videos. Those will be presented at the Guggenheim in New York on Oct. 21.

"It's become increasingly obvious that this kind of creative video is completely core to YouTube," said Anna Bateson, director of marketing for YouTube. "It's a fundamental part of what the site is doing, and yet it wasn't really being celebrated."

The chosen videos vary wildly, from well-known YouTube hits to little-seen works by students and amateurs.

More familiar selections include the OK Go music video "This Too Shall Pass," which features a Rube Goldberg apparatus, a complicated machine designed to perform a simple task, and the "Human Mirror" video, in which a subway car is lined by apparent twins mimicking each other's movements, by the comedy troupe Improv Everywhere.

Others are less heralded, like a jogging video by multimedia performer Jillian Mayer, in which rural video is projected against the urban landscape along her path.

Many videos utilize various forms of animation, particularly stop-motion animation. Joe Penna, known to most as MysteryGuitarMan, pieces together a classical guitar piece one shot — and one note — at a time.

Joan Young, associated curator of contemporary art at the Guggenheim, said the selected videos show the breadth of the materials on YouTube.

"We focused on works that really were conceived from the start for an online medium, so not necessarily works that were to be projected in a museum space or works that simply documented a performance," she said. "The idea really is working with the medium."

The videos are assembled at http://www.youtube.com/play






Noteboek by Evelien Lohbeck (evelienlohbeck)
Freelance artist Evelien Lohbeck’s paper notebook works like a laptop computer. And on the screen you see her YouTube films, and discover that the notebook is also a toaster and a make-up mirror.



Walter is an animated puppet who appears in stop-motion films. His maker wants to make him understand he has no power over his own existence.




Cardboard by Sjors Vervoort (svervoor)
Cardboard creatures turn up all over the city. The insects are the creation of character designer and animator Sjors Vervoort.


Revenge by Lernert Engelberts (lernertE)
And egg waits for a champagne cork to pop. The film by writer and director Lernert Engelberts (1977) is called 'Revenge'. The pop means the end for both the champagne and the egg.



The result of 40 years of consistently taking passport photos, by Harry de Dood’ 1960-2002. The baby Harry changes into a toddler, a little boy, and so on. One photo flows into another. In less than three minutes, we see more than 30 years of life flash by.



Why Do Things Get in a Muddle by Jean-Baptiste Maitre (jeanbaptistem)
The French photographer Jean-Baptiste Maitre (1978) made ‘Why do things get in a muddle’. This question gradually unfolds on the screen in letters made up of fluorescent tubes. Maitre trained in France and the Netherlands and is currently a resident artist at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in Amsterdam.

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